Stone Age hunter-gatherers’ diet may have been full of heavy-metals, and during a time of sea level rise

© Lou-Foto/Alamy Stock PhotoAn artist’s illustration of Stone Age hunter-gatherers fishing. You’ll be healthier if you ate as your ancestors did. At least that’s the promise of some modern fads such as the “caveman” or paleo diet — characterized by avoiding processed food and grains and only eating things like meat, fish, and seeds. But a new study suggests the food some early humans in Norway ate may have not only been unhealthy, but downright toxic. In some cases, these people may have consumed more than 20 times the levels…

Read More

Radar clues reignite debate over hidden burial chambers

© Oliver Lang/DDP/AFP/GettyA limestone bust of Egypt’s queen Nefertiti is on display at the Neues Museum, Berlin. A radar survey around the tomb of Tutankhamun in Egypt’s Valley of the Kings has revealed possible evidence of further hidden chambers behind its walls. The findings — in an unpublished report, details of which have been seen by Nature — resurrect a controversial theory that the young king’s burial place hides the existence of a larger tomb, which could contain the mysterious Egyptian queen Nefertiti. Researchers led by archaeologist Mamdouh Eldamaty, a…

Read More

BEST OF THE WEB: Mysterious egalitarian ‘megasites’ could rewrite history of world’s first cities

© Nebelivka Project, produced by M. NebbiaFarmland in Ukraine now covers most of an ancient settlement called Nebelivka that some researchers consider to be one of the earliest known cities. Here, Nebelivka’s site plan is superimposed over where it once stood. Nebelivka, a Ukrainian village of about 700 people, sits amid rolling hills and grassy fields. Here at the edge of Eastern Europe, empty space stretches to the horizon. It wasn’t always so. Beneath the surface of Nebelivka’s surrounding landscape and at nearby archaeological sites, roughly 6,000-year-old remnants of what…

Read More

SOTT FOCUS: MindMatters: Zoroastrianism: The Ancient System of Values That Sought to Change The World, And Did

More than several millennia ago, a spiritual leader in Persia had a very high vision and ideal for humanity that he labored to preach and spread. In what is now known as Iran, this priest and reformer – who we know as Zarathustra (or Zoroaster) – began with a strong conception of both good and evil, and man’s choice to be a manifestation of either. He saw this choice, and the awareness of it as a choice – as not only crucial to the future of his tribe and his…

Read More

Neanderthal skeleton dated to 70,000 years ago discovered at ‘flower burial’ site in Iraq

The first articulated Neanderthal skeleton to come out of the ground for over 20 years has been unearthed at one of the most important sites of mid-20th century archaeology: Shanidar Cave, in the foothills of Iraqi Kurdistan. The first articulated Neanderthal skeleton to come out of the ground for over 20 years has been unearthed at one of the most important sites of mid-20th century archaeology: Shanidar Cave, in the foothills of Iraqi Kurdistan. Researchers say the new find offers an unparalleled opportunity to investigate the “mortuary practices” of this…

Read More

The Italian ‘Years of Lead’ and secret “strategy of tension” that may be a foreshadowing of America’s future

While there are some in the United States who believe we are headed toward another Civil War, there is perhaps another, more recent parallel worth exploring – the so-called “Italian Years of Lead.” The short version is that in the late 1960s through the early 1980s, Italy was a hotbed of assassination, shoot-outs and bombings between various factions of the far-left, the far-right and the Italian government – with American, British and Soviet intelligence agencies often pulling the strings. While the death toll was a lot lower than it could…

Read More

Earliest evidence of ancient plant foods discovered in Australia

© The University of Queensland Australia’s first plant foods – eaten by early populations 65,000 years ago – have been discovered in Arnhem Land. Preserved as pieces of charcoal, the morsels were recovered from the debris of ancient cooking hearths at the Madjedbebe archaeological site, on Mirarr country in northern Australia. University of Queensland archaeobotanist Anna Florin said a team of archaeologists and Traditional Owners identified 10 plant foods, including several types of fruits and nuts, underground storage organs (‘roots and tubers’), and palm stem. “By working with Elders and…

Read More

Egypt: Great Pyramid exposed after tiny robot explores mystery shaft in Queen’s Chamber

EGYPT’s Great Pyramid of Giza has been exposed after a tiny robot headed into the air shafts of the ancient structure, making a breakthrough discovery which “adds another dimension to the story” Express.co.uk can exclusively reveal. © GETTYThe robot headed into the Great Pyramid Led by a team of Britons, the Djedi Mission used state of the art robotics and technology designed for space exploration to finally look beyond the famous Gantenbrink Door. First spotted in 1993, the stone slab was hiding 65 metres up an airshaft behind the Queen’s…

Read More

BEST OF THE WEB FLASHBACK: Canada has a momumental Ukrainian Nazi problem

The monument to Roman Shukhevych, commander of the Ukrainian Insurgent Army from 1943 until his death in 1950, has stood at the entrance of the Ukrainian Youth Unity Complex in North Edmonton, Alberta, since mid-1970s. Shukhevych is lionized by some for his fight for Ukrainian independence against Poland, the Soviet Union and later Germany. But critics of the monument say it glorifies a Nazi henchman who sided with Germany in hopes of winning independence for Ukraine. (Photo courtesy of John-Paul Himka) A Canadian monument to a hero of an anti-Soviet…

Read More

5,200-year-old grains redate trans-Eurasian crop exchange, climate was warmer and more humid

© Jianjun YuA photo of the stone men (Chimulchek Culture) in the steppe area of Altai Mountains. These figures are characteristic of the peoples who lived in the area around the time of occupation at Tongtian. These specific examples are located at the Chimulchek site (ca. 4000 years old) and not far from Tongtian Cave. Ceramic sherds from the cave suggest that the occupants in the cave shared similar cultural traits to other people in the region. Cereals from the Fertile Crescent and broomcorn millet from northern China spread across…

Read More

Walls made of human bones discovered under Ghent cathedral

© Ruben WillaertArchaeologists uncover low walls made of stacked thigh and shin bones Archaeologists working in and around Saint-Bavo’s cathedral in Ghent have made a macabre discovery – walls constructed entirely out of human bones. “This find is unique in Belgium,” said a spokesperson for the archaeological team from Ruben Willaert bvba in Bruges. The walls are made mainly of the thigh and shin bones of adults. Between the walls, the space is filled with skulls, many of them shattered. Above that level, meanwhile, full human skeletons have been uncovered.…

Read More

Last mammoths plagued by genetic defects

© Albert ProtopopovA mammoth at the Mammoth museum in Yakutsk The world’s last woolly mammoths, sequestered on an Arctic Ocean island outpost, suffered from serious genetic defects caused by generations of inbreeding that may have hampered traits such as sense of smell and male fertility in the doomed population. Scientists said on Friday that the genome of one of the last mammoths from Wrangel Island off Siberia’s coast showed that the population was riddled with deleterious mutations. They resurrected genes from this mammoth in the laboratory to find clues about…

Read More

Fossils shed new light on car-sized turtle that once roamed South America

Stupendemys geographicus, armed with sturdy horns, lived from about 13m to 7m years ago alongside giant crocodilians © JA Chirinos/ReutersThe huge extinct freshwater turtle Stupendemys geographicus, that lived in lakes and rivers in northern South America during the Miocene Epoch, is seen in an illustration. Scientists have unearthed new fossils of one of the largest turtles that ever lived: a car-sized reptile which prowled the lakes and rivers of what is now northern South America from about 13m years ago to 7m years ago. The fossils of the turtle –…

Read More

Geneticists find evidence of unknown ‘ghost archaic’ human species

© CCO Researchers have concluded that this archaic population split an estimated million years ago from the lineage that led to modern humans, and is connected to neither the Neanderthal and Denisovan families whose DNA is carried in modern humans. New research carried out by two geneticists from the University of California, Los Angeles, has found evidence of an extinct branch of human. Geneticists Arun Durvasula and Sriram Sankararaman found pieces of DNA from a so-called ghost archaic population hiding in the genomes of some living populations in West Africa…

Read More

Is a 37,000 year old Aboriginal tale about a volcano the oldest story ever told?

© Eugene von Guerard/WikiCommons/Creative CommonsA 19th century drawing of the lake in the crater at the top of Budj Bim. Long ago, four giant beings arrived in southeast Australia. Three strode out to other parts of the continent, but one crouched in place. His body transformed into a volcano called Budj Bim, and his teeth became the lava the volcano spat out. Now, scientists say this tale — told by the Aboriginal Gunditjmara people of the area — may have some basis in fact. About 37,000 years ago, Budj Bim…

Read More

Pompeii’s “excellent” drains to be brought back into service after 2,300 years

Since 2018, the 1,500ft (457m) network of tunnels (pictured), which are big enough for a human to fit into, have been carefully assessed Pompeii’s ancient drainage system is in such good condition that it is set to be put back into active service, despite being built almost 2,300 years ago. A 1,500ft stretch of tunnels underneath some of the famed Italian city’s most iconic structures was originally built to drain water downhill away from Pompeii’s centre. Analysis of the tunnels revealed they had been almost untouched for millennia and the…

Read More

Havering hoard: UK’s largest Bronze Age hoard hints to unknown links with Europe

© David Parry/PAA rare terret ring discovered in the Havering hoard. One of the largest and most mysterious bronze age hoards ever found in the UK contains objects that have astonished archaeologists, including items more commonly found in France and the Alps. The Museum of London on Monday revealed new finds among the Havering hoard, a remarkable collection of 453 swords, axes, knives, chisels, sickles, razors, ingots and bracelets excavated from a quarry in east London over a period of three months and revealed last year. Dating from 900-800BC, it…

Read More

7,300-year-old Neolithic massacre discovered in the Pyrenees Mountains of Spain

© Alt et al. / Scientific Reports El Trocs Cave (pictured above) is nestled in a serene, picturesque part of the Pyrenees Mountains in Spain, but 7,300 years ago, the area’s tranquility was shattered by gruesome violence. Five adults and four children between the ages of three and seven were brutally murdered around 5300 BCE. Their skeletal remains were recently discovered and analyzed by an international team of researchers. “The violent events in Els Trocs are without parallel either in Spain or in the rest of Europe at that time,”…

Read More

15,000 year old carvings of dozens of animals and abstract symbols discovered in Spanish cave

© Generalitat de Catalunya In a discovery that local media have dubbed the ‘Catalan Altamira’, an extraordinary trove of 15,000-year-old carvings, depicting dozens of animals, has been found in a cave in northeast Spain’s Tarragona region. Around 100 carvings of animals including horses, oxen and deer, as well as mysterious abstract symbols, were found in a cave in the village of L’Espluga de Francolí. © Generalitat de Catalunya The ancient artworks were revealed on Friday after being discovered in the wake of floods last October. The engravings are extremely delicate,…

Read More

Milk and Mongolia: What bacterial cultures reveal about ours

© Heirloom Microbes Project.Herder Dalaimyagmar and her husband, Byambaa, demonstrate how to press whey from curds in creating aaruul, a staple dairy product in Mongolia. Dairying is one of the great puzzles of history. An archaeologist set out to unravel it and, in the process, discovered Mongolia’s hidden wealth of endangered microbes. In the remote northern steppes of Mongolia, in 2017, anthropologist Christina Warinner and her colleagues were interviewing local herders about dairying practices. One day, a yak and cattle herder, Dalaimyagmar, demonstrated how she makes traditional yogurt and cheeses.…

Read More

9,900-year-old skeleton of horribly disfigured woman from mysterious isolated group found in Mexican cave

© Eugenio AcevezDivers discovered the ancient woman’s remains in the Chan Hol cave, near Tulum, Mexico. The underwater survey was led by Jerónimo Avilés, a speleologist (cave explorer and researcher) at the Museum of the Desert of Coahuila. Cave divers have discovered the eerie underwater grave of an ancient woman with a deformed skull who lived on the Yucatán Peninsula at least 9,900 years ago, making her one of the earliest known inhabitants of what is now Mexico. The woman’s skull had three distinct injuries, indicating that something hard hit…

Read More

5,000 year old tomb named ‘Dwarfie Stane’ cut into rock on the Island of Hoy, Scotland

© Unknown An ancient and huge piece of red sandstone which called “Dwarfie Stane”. This 5,000-year-old block is surrounded by mystery, which has not been solved until today. There is no record who, in what manner and for what purpose or purposes, made this great job. The curious stone lies in a steep-sided and remote valley between Quoys and Rackwick on the island of Hoy, in Orkney, Scotland and is believed to be Britain’s only example of a rock-cut tomb. Between the Neolithic and the Early Bronze Age, probably estimated…

Read More

Rare fossil of bone-crushing Triassic-era crocodile cousin found in Brazil

© Illustration by Márcio L. CastroThis newly discovered species of prehistoric reptile, called Dynamosuchus collisensi, lived 230 million years ago during the Triassic period. Its back was protected by two rows of dermal bones. The prehistoric reptile likely played a surprising but vital role in its Triassic ecosystem. Rodrigo Müller was working a block of rock and dirt at the base of Agudo Hill, an hour from Porto Alegre, when he first saw an unusual set of osteoderms, bony deposits that form plates on the skin of a reptile or…

Read More

Ötzi the iceman, the multiple mosses, and his final days

© Paul HANNY/Gamma-Rapho via Getty ImagesÖtzi, freshly discovered, in situ, in 1991. After 5,300 years, Ötzi the Iceman continues to divulge secrets. Archaeobotanists recently identified seventy-five different species of mosses and liverworts (a non-vascular plant similar to moss) that were sprinkled on the neolithic man’s clothing, sequestered in his gut, and buried in the icy gully where he lay for millennia after his murder by the Schnalstal/Val Senales glacier in the Ötzal Alps. Many of these bryophtyes — another term for mosses and liverworts — are not local to the…

Read More

A new study says footprints in volcanic rock probably belong to Homo heidelbergensis

© Ars TechnicaLocal residents call the tracks Ciampate del Diavolo, or the Devil’s Path. Roccamonfina volcano, about 60km northwest of Vesuvius, erupted violently around 350,000 years ago. Pyroclastic flows — deadly torrents of hot gas and volcanic ash — raced down the sides of the mountain. But within a few days, a small group of hominins trekked across the layer of ash and pumice that covered the steep mountainside. Recent analysis and some newly identified prints suggest that the intrepid (or reckless) hominins may have been Homo heidelbergensis who lived…

Read More

3800 year-old spoons made from bones found in Mongolia

© AKI Press Spoons found in Mongolia are said to have been used during the time of ancient Egypt, and the Shang dynasty as early as 4,000 years ago, Montsame reported. In correlation with the matter, it has been found that ancient Mongolians used to make spoons out of bones, which traces back at least 3,800 years ago, from the findings discovered by a research team of the Archeology Department of Ulaanbaatar State University. As a result of their excavation done between 2002 and 2011, the research team had found…

Read More

Declassified: An expose on Israeli plot to prepare Arab lands for Jewish settlement via Martial Law

© CC0Ramla prisoners of war, July 12-13, 1948 Between 1948 and 1966, over 150,000 Arabs living within Israel’s post-independence borders were governed by military rule, faced curfews, travel restrictions, and the threat of arbitrary arrest and expulsion. The draconian circumstances faced by Arab-Israelis during the period of military rule were not instituted on the basis of security considerations or any real fear of an Arab uprising, but were part of a concerted plan to drive the minority from the land and to clear the way for Jewish settlement, a declassified…

Read More