Humans have been making poison arrows for over 70,000 years

From slaying centaurs to biblical mentions, poison-tipped arrows are a staple of cultural stories in the west. But they’ve also proved highly effective in reality, so much so that indigenous peoples around the world are still making use of them today, to successfully feed themselves and their families. The Kalahari San of southern Africa hunt with small bone- or iron-tipped arrows that may look quite dainty, but when coated with poison, they also prove quite lethal. The hunter-gatherers daub their weapons with larvae entrails of a beetle called Diamphidia nigroonata.…

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Scientists Resurrect 100-Million-Year-Old Life Buried Under Seafloor Since Dinosaur Age

Jake Anderson, The Mind Unleashed Waking Times Researchers studying ancient mud from below the seafloor recently made a stunning discovery. They found that by simply adding food they were able to revive bacteria life that has laid dormant for 101.5-million-years. Scientists at the Japan Agency for Marine-Earth Science and Technology extracted sediment from 70 meters below the seafloor. At this depth, the sediment represented about 100 million years of time and could not have contained any modern bacteria. Researchers plied the mud with sugar and ammonia and soon microbial cells began to…

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BEST OF THE WEB: The Long, Hot Summer of 1967: A Forgotten Season of Riots and Urban Unrest Across America

A forgotten season of riots and urban unrest across America The Book of Ecclesiastes says that there is nothing new under the sun. And while many have spoken of the “unprecedented” nature of the rioting in the early summer of 2020, it is actually quite precedented. The Long, Hot Summer of 1967 was the peak of urban unrest and rioting in the United States in the lead up to the 1968 election. While there are certainly a number of key differences, there are also a number of striking parallels that…

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8,000 years old fluted stone tools discovered in Arabia

A new paper published in the journal PLOS ONE examines fluted projectile points from southern Arabia, detailing production methods and technical aspects that indicate differences in function from the technology of the Americas, despite similarities in form. Findings from experimentation and comparative analysis suggest that highly-skilled, convergent technologies can have varying anthropological implications. A new study led by archaeologists from the CNRS, the Inrap, the Ohio State University and the Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History, reports on fluted points from the archaeological sites of Manayzah in…

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Nested ‘DNA’ of ancestor that mated with humans discovered

Today’s humans carry the genes of an ancient, unknown ancestor, left there by hominin species intermingling perhaps a million years ago. The ancestor may have been Homo erectus, but no one knows for sure — the genome of that extinct species of human has never been sequenced, said Adam Siepel, a computational biologist at Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory and one of the authors of a new paper examining the relationships of ancient human ancestors. The new research, published today (Aug. 6) in the journal PLOS Genetics, also finds that ancient…

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ATOMIC BOMBINGS AT 75: John Pilger – Another Hiroshima is Coming – Unless We Stop It Now

John Pilger, Guest Waking Times When I first went to Hiroshima in 1967, the shadow on the steps was still there. It was an almost perfect impression of a human being at ease: legs splayed, back bent, one hand by her side as she sat waiting for a bank to open. At a quarter past eight on the morning of August 6, 1945, she and her silhouette were burned into the granite. I stared at the shadow for an hour or more, then I walked down to the river where…

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Lithuania’s alleged involvement in 2014 Ukraine Maidan coup

New scandalous information about the 2014 Maidan coup d’état in Ukraine has emerged that implicates Lithuania’s important role in instigating the violent events. David Zhvania, a former Member of the Ukrainian Parliament, revealed on his YouTube channel that the seizure of power in Ukraine was financed in “several ways.” “One of the external sources was the Lithuanian embassy, ​​through which money and weapons were transferred, and the internal channel was Diamantbank. I have documented evidence to support my words,” said the former ally of Petro Poroshenko, the previous president of…

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Lost Viking waterway found in Orkney revealing Norse impact on local economy

The route was discovered after a series of Old Norse place names in the centre of the mainland, which were connected to sea and boats despite being many miles from the sea, attracted interest from researchers. Now it is believed that Vikings were using a route from Harray in the central mainland through the Loch of Banks to a portage at Twatt before reaching the Loch of Boardhouse and ultimately the coastal powerbases of the Norse Earls at the Brough of Birsay, a tidal island off the very tip of…

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Atomic bombings at 75: John Pilger says another Hiroshima is coming – unless we stop it now

Hiroshima and Nagasaki were acts of premeditated mass murder unleashing a weapon of intrinsic criminality. It was justified by lies that form the bedrock of 21st century U.S. war propaganda, casting a new enemy, and target – China. When I first went to Hiroshima in 1967, the shadow on the steps was still there. It was an almost perfect impression of a human being at ease: legs splayed, back bent, one hand by her side as she sat waiting for a bank to open. At a quarter past eight on…

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America’s ‘Days of Rage’: A look into the extensive left-wing bombings & domestic terrorism of the 1970s

As the summer of 2020 dawned, left-wing radical groups began rioting and taking over parts of America’s cities. While this specific form of left-wing violence is new, left-wing violence itself is far from new in the United States. Indeed, one of the most hidden and concealed parts of recent American history is the extensive left-wing violence that began in the late 1960s and continued into the 1980s. At first, one might think that these were isolated incidents of small-scale “protest” or even minor violence. However, upon even brief examination, we…

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Figurines found at ancient dig site may depict face of God, says Israeli archeologist

The professor studying the figures believes they may have been used at pilgrimage centers to form a kind of metaphysical connection between God and Man, “a contact between earth and heaven, the core of the religious experience.” Dr. Yosef Garfinkel, a veteran archeologist from Hebrew University in Jerusalem, has proposed a fascinating theory which suggests that a series of three small clay figurines recently discovered at the archeological sites of Khirbet Qeiyafa and Moza, and two similar antiquities previously put on display at the Israel Museum, may in fact be…

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The Solar Minimum superstorm of 1903

Don’t let Solar Minimum fool you. The sun can throw a major tantrum even during the quiet phase of the 11-year solar cycle. That’s the conclusion of a new study published in the July 1st edition of the Astrophysical Journal Letters. “In late October 1903, one of the strongest solar storms in modern history hit Earth,” say the lead authors of the study, Hisashi Hayakawa (Osaka University, Japan) and Paulo Ribeiro (Coimbra University, Portugal). “The timing of the storm interestingly parallels where we are now-near Solar Minimum just after a…

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Pompeii’s recent finds reveal new clues to city’s destruction

Since its discovery several centuries ago, few archaeological sites have fascinated the world as has the ancient Roman city of Pompeii. After the first major excavations in more than 50 years, Pompeii is revealing a surprising abundance of buried treasures. The new finds are coming from intensive work in a small sector known as Region V that has nevertheless yielded giant insights into the final days of the doomed city. Along with the complete excavation of two houses — the House of the Garden and the House of Orion —…

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Mexico cave with evidence of early humans closed to visitors to prevent DNA contamination

Tourists or locals visiting a cave in north-central Mexico could endanger what is purported to be some of the earliest evidence of human presence in North America, archaeological authorities said Thursday. Mexico’s National Institute of Anthropology and History said the remote Chiquihuite cave in Zacatecas state has been declared off-limits to visitors. Scientists “are looking for the DNA of ancient humans in the sediments (of the cave floor), thus human presence could contaminate strata that has been preserved intact for thousands of years,” the institute said. Source

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Underground Salt Cathedral of Poland: The magical underground city carved entirely out of Salt Rock

Few underground cities in the world are sculpted entirely out of rock salt. That’s the magic of Poland’s fantastic Wieliczka Salt Mine, near the city of Kraków. A famed tourist attraction, a site of worship and even weddings, a gripping gallery of artistic reliefs, everything in Wieliczka is carved from salt blocks. Mining operations stopped in 1996, but for many centuries in the past Wieliczka was the most significant cog in the local region’s economy Source

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SOTT FOCUS: MindMatters: Interview with Gary Lachman: The Return of Holy Russia

The American clairvoyant Edgar Cayce once said, “Through Russia, comes the hope of the world.” He spoke those words in the era of Stalin, and it would be another 60 years or so before the end of Communism. But starting in the tumultuous 90s, the great country straddling East and West not only has made a comeback on the world stage – it is seeing a spiritual revival of sorts. Forgotten thinkers are being resurrected in the minds of Russians, new movements are cropping up, and old ones reinvigorated. While…

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The Re-Conversion of the Ayasofya: Starting the Countdown to 2023

Dr. Can Erimtan 21st Century Wire Turkey has now been ruled by Recep Tayyip Erdoğan (aka the Prez, as a shorthand for his status as the first popularly elected President of the Republic) and his Justice and Development Party (or AKP) have for the whole of the 21st century (with the notable exception of this millennium when the party had not yet been founded). Erdoğan and his AKP henchmen have even ushered in what they call the New Turkey –  as they like to call the country in the aftermath…

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Exact match for Stonehenge’s 20 tonne sarsen stones found 15 miles away

Today West Woods in Wiltshire is a popular spot for hikers, dog walkers and mountain bikers, famed for its bluebells in the springtime. Stick to the footpaths and it is easy to miss the hefty flat stones hidden in the undergrowth. But groundbreaking scientific research published on Wednesday reveals that, 4,500 years ago, this spot – and in particular those hulking sandstone boulders – drew the ancient architects of Stonehenge. The research, made possible after a piece of one of the stones taken away as a souvenir 60 years ago…

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Iran’s future will be prosperous: A 150-year fight for sovereignty from oil to nuclear energy

This is Part 3 of the series “Follow the Trail of Blood and Oil” From Arc of Crisis to Corridors of Development Akbar Hashemi Rafsanjani became President of Iran on August 16th 1989 and served two terms (1989-1997). Rafsanjani, who is considered one of the Founding Fathers of the Islamic Republic, began the effort to rebuild the country’s basic infrastructure, after the ravages of the Iran-Iraq War and launched a series of infrastructure projects not only domestically but in cooperation with neighbouring countries. Following the dissolution of the Soviet Union…

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Embossed stone blocks from King Ramses II reign discovered in Egypt

Archaeologists conducting a rescue project have discovered several embossed stone blocks and statues from the reign of King Ramses II and Egypt’s Coptic era. The rescue project is being conducted by the Supreme Council of Archaeology near the ancient capital of Memphis, in the modern-day town of Mit Rahina. The embossed blocks from Ramesses II’s reign were made from pink and black granite, and limestone along with a statue of the pharaoh himself. Researchers believe that the limestone blocks that date from the Coptic era (Late Roman Egypt and Byzantine…

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Collapse of ancient economy in the grip of plague and climate change revealed by grape pips

A team of archeologists from Bar-Ilan University and the University of Haifa has discovered new and compelling evidence for a significant economic downturn on the fringe of the Byzantine Empire in the aftermath of a major pandemic in the mid-sixth century CE. The research reconstructs the rise and fall of commercial viticulture in the middle of Israel’s arid Negev desert using evidence about life during that period found in an unexpected place: the trash. While countries grapple with the new reality imposed by the COVID-19 pandemic, many researchers look to…

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The reasons for Qaddafi’s overthrow

This investigation sets forth a timeline of events Libya and examines the reasons behind the attack, overthrow, and murder of Muammar Qaddafi, the late leader of Libya. According to western mainstream media propaganda, he was deposed in a popular uprising of his people, and his brutal crackdown of those home-grown protests created the need for the US and NATO to intervene for humanitarian reasons, under “the responsibility to protect”. 1933: US President Franklin Roosevelt replaced gold domestically with central bank-created reserves, but gold remained the reserve currency internationally. 1944: The…

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Mediterranean Sea was warmer during the Roman Empire, warmest period of the last 2,000 years

The Mediterranean Sea was 3.6°F (2°C) hotter during the Roman Empire than other average temperatures at the time, a new study claims. The Empire coincided with a 500-year period, from AD 1 to AD 500, that was the warmest period of the last 2,000 years in the almost completely land-locked sea. The climate later progressed towards colder and arid conditions that coincided with the historical fall of the Empire, scientists claim. Comment: When followed the warm period was much more devastating: 536 AD: Plague, famine, drought, cold, and a mysterious…

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Earliest confirmed case of smallpox found in bones from Denmark to Russia during Viking era

The Vikings are known for their intrepid seafaring, fearsome fighting and extensive trading, but it seems it may not only have been goods and weapons they carried on their travels – they could also have carried a deadly disease. Researchers say they have found the world’s earliest confirmed case of smallpox, revealing the disease was widespread across northern Europe during the Viking age. “I think it is fair to assume the Vikings have been the superspreaders,” said Eske Willerslev, professor of ecology and evolution at the University of Cambridge and…

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America Before: The Key to Earth’s Lost Civilisation

Frank Joseph, New Dawn Waking Times As the former editor-in-chief (1993 to 2007) and ongoing writer for Ancient American – a US magazine examining Old World impact on the New World before 1492 – recently released materials regarding pre-Columbian possibilities often come my way. I was surprised, however, to find that Graham Hancock’s latest tome, America Before, compares remarkably with Before Atlantis (2013), my own book, published six years earlier, in more than title. Both works go into the Bering land-bridge Theory, megalithic alignments with the Cygnus constellation, Easter Island’s moai, Gobekli Tepe, the discoveries of Albert…

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