Scientists identify 34,000-year-old early East Asian of mixed Eurasian descent

In a new study, researchers at the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology in Germany and the Mongolian Academy of Sciences present an analysis of the genome of the oldest human fossil found in Mongolia to date. They show that the 34,000-year-old female inherited around 25 percent of her DNA from western Eurasians, demonstrating that people moved across the Eurasian continent shortly after it had first been settled by the ancestors of present-day populations. The study also shows that this individual as well as a 40,000-year-old individual from China carried…

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FLASHBACK: A brief history of government-funded electromagnetic, informational weapons and the remote manipulation of the human brain

Editors Note: We bring to our readers this carefully documented review article by Mojmir Babajek first published in 2004. While the text deals with a number of complex scientific processes, the implications of these findings are far-reaching. This study also has a bearing on the current Corona crisis. The arsenal of electromagnetic and informational weapons, used to manipulate the human mind of targeted individuals or populations, is an integral part of the weapons system of the New World Order. The US military possesses a sophisticated arsenal of psychotronic weapons which…

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The revelations of Wikileaks: No. 9 – Opening the CIA’s vault

As its publisher remains in prison awaiting judgment on his extradition case, we continue our series of looking at WikiLeaks’ significant revelations contributing to the public’s right to know. On Feb. 6, 2017, WikiLeaks released documents detailing the Central Intelligence Agency’s espionage program in the months leading up to and following France’s presidential election in 2012. The agency used spies and cyberweapons to infiltrate and hack into the major political parties with competing candidates — the Socialists, the National Front and the Union for a Popular Movement. Their candidates —…

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Ancient Maya had incredibly effective water filtration system

Water is essential for basic human survival. But it can also be dangerous; contaminated water can spread deadly diseases that have the potential to eradicate whole communities. Safe, clean water offers humanity one of its best chances to thrive. Several ancient civilisations, including the Greeks, Egyptians, and Romans, filtered their water. Sanskrit writings dating back to 2,000 BCE also mention water treatment methods. Now, archaeologists have discovered the Maya of Central America did too – and their water filtration system was incredibly effective. In a reservoir in what was once…

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Inks containing lead on Egyptian papyri unveil ancient writings

Analysing 12 ancient Egyptian papyri fragments with X-ray microscopy, University of Copenhagen researchers were surprised to find previously unknown lead compounds in both red and black inks and suggest they were used for their drying properties rather than as a pigment. A similar lead-based “drying technique” has also been documented in 15th century European painting, and the discovery of it in Egyptian papyri calls for a reassessment of ancient lead-based pigments. The ancient Egyptians have been using inks for writing since at least 3200 BC, using black inks for the…

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BEST OF THE WEB: Treason in America: An overview of the FBI, CIA and matters of ‘National Security’

“Treason doth never prosper; what is the reason? Why, if it prosper, none dare call it treason.” – Sir John Harrington. As Shakespeare would state in his play Hamlet, “Something is rotten in the state of Denmark,” like a fish that rots from head to tail, so do corrupt government systems rot from top to bottom. This is a reference to the ruling system of Denmark and not just the foul murder that King Claudius has committed against his brother, Hamlet’s father. This is showcased in the play by reference…

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The brilliance of ancient engineers shows in watermill complex in southern France

An international team of scientists has reconstructed the hydraulic operations of the 1,900-year-old Barbegal industrial watermill complex in southern France, revealing the subtle brilliance of antiquity’s engineers. The Barbegal watermill complex was a set of sixteen water wheels arranged in two parallel columns of eight along a thirty-meter slope near the French town of Arles. It’s been hailed as having the “greatest known concentration of mechanical power in the ancient world.” Each wheel was connected to a grinding mechanism, which milled grain into flour, perhaps as much as 25 tonnes…

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Fossil footprints mark a toddler’s perilous prehistoric journey

Mammoths and giant ground sloths roamed the same terrain that a young adult swiftly moved through while toting a young child. The human footprint sequence from the Pleistocene era extends more than a mile and includes at least 427 human prints. The out-and-back journey was probably completed in no more than a few hours, the researchers suggested.Credit…Reynolds et al., Quaternary Science Reviews 2020 Several thousand years ago, a young adult moved barefoot across a muddy landscape. A toddler was balanced on the adult’s hip. There were large animals — mammoths…

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Bronze Age herders ‘less mobile than previously thought’

Bronze Age pastoralists in what is now southern Russia apparently covered shorter distances than previously thought. It is believed that the Indo-European languages may have originated from this region, and these findings raise new questions about how technical and agricultural innovations spread to Europe. An international research team, with the participation of the University of Basel, has published a paper on this topic. During the Bronze Age (ca. 3900 – 1000 BCE), herders and their families moved across the slopes of the Caucasus and the steppes to the north, taking…

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Medieval plague outbreaks picked up speed over 300 years

McMaster University researchers who analyzed thousands of documents covering a 300-year span of plague outbreaks in London, England, have estimated that the disease spread four times faster in the 17th century than it had in the 14th century. The findings, published today in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, show a striking acceleration in plague transmission between the Black Death of 1348, estimated to have wiped out more than one-third of the population of Europe, and later epidemics, which culminated in the Great Plague of 1665. Researchers found…

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Indus Valley civilization earliest known producer of dairy and dairy products, according to new research.

The lands that make up modern-day Pakistan and India have been producing dairy for almost five thousand years now, according to researchers at the University of Toronto Mississauga. The team explains that dairy has been produced and consumed by the people of the Indus Valley Civilization from as far back as 2500 BCE. Original cheese “We found that dairy was an integral part of their diet at a site that dates to about 2500 BCE,” says Chakraborty, who is conducting his post-doctoral research with Heather Miller, an anthropology professor at…

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Huge cat found etched into desert among Nazca lines in Peru, a geoglyph from 200-100BC

The dun sands of southern Peru, etched centuries ago with geoglyphs of a hummingbird, a monkey, an orca – and a figure some would dearly love to believe is an astronaut – have now revealed the form of an enormous cat lounging across a desert hillside. The feline Nazca line, dated to between 200BC and 100BC, emerged during work to improve access to one of the hills that provides a natural vantage point from which many of the designs can be seen. A Unesco world heritage site since 1994, the…

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Lives of Neolithic peoples in Greece revealed in new findings from Theopetra Cave

The Theopetra Cave in Thessaly, Central Greece, was formed in the Upper Cretaceous period, 137,000,000 – 65,000,000 years before the present time. The cave that was created in the limestone there has been inhabited since the Middle Paleolithic period, and new findings give new insight into the lives of those early peoples. According to archaeologists, the cave is likely to be the place of the oldest human construction on earth, as findings indicate that the shelter was inhabited as early as 130,000 years ago. Excavations at Theopetra began in 1987…

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12-Year-Old unearths 69-million-year old rare fossil in Canada

Nathan Hrushkin, a 12-year-old boy, discovered a dinosaur skeleton dating back 69 million years in a fossil-rich part of Alberta, Canada, this past July. According to the CTV News, the amateur paleontologist discovered the hadrosaur fossil in the Nature Conservancy of Canada’s Nodwell property at Horseshoe Canyon. When Hrushkin first saw the fossils, he was “literally speechless,” he told the BBC. “I wasn’t even excited, even though I know I should have [been] … I was in so much shock that I had actually found a dinosaur discovery,” he added.…

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Leather balls represent oldest evidence of ancient Eurasian ball game

Balls found in the ancient graves of horse riders in northwestern China reveal evidence of a 3,000-year-old sport. These fist-sized balls, made of leather and filled with hair and other soft material, predate any balls found in Eurasia so far. “It is likely that the three balls were used in a team sport,” said Patrick Wertmann, an archeologist at the University of Zurich in Switzerland. He is one of the authors of a study published recently in the Journal of Archaeological Science: Reports. The oldest known ball in the world…

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Early humans controlled fire to make stone tools

A new study, borrowing techniques from artificial intelligence research, suggests hominins in the eastern Mediterranean forged flint blades in flame, a task that requires creating and controlling heat. Humanity’s creation and mastery of fire likely came in stages. Being able to reliably kindle this source of light and heat was only one step, managing the flames was another. It was a crucial turning point in human evolution when Homo sapiens — or one of our species’ hominin relatives — first controlled fire not only as a safeguard from predators, but…

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Older than Giza pyramids? Millenia-old signs of life found by archeologists in Turkey

Archaeologists in eastern Turkey’s Van have discovered traces of life dating back at least 5,000 years, around the time of the dawn of ancient Egypt. The Culture and Tourism Ministry authorized excavations at the İremir Höyük (Mound) in Van’s Gürpinar district found a series of artifacts that likely date back to the early Bronze Age, according to experts. A 15-member team of anthropologists, archaeologists and art historians have been unearthing the early Bronze Age habitats and artifacts. The pottery and ceramics excavated from the area, believed to be used as…

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Legendary ancient Torlonia Marbles to go on display after decades in the dark

The legendary Torlonia Collection, considered among the world’s most important private collections of Greek-Roman classical art, will at last come to light after being largely hidden away for more than 70 years. Palazzo Caffarelli, a newly-restored exhibition space in Rome’s Capitoline Museums, will display 92 pieces from the priceless collection of 620 ancient sculptures in a blockbuster show entitled The Torlonia Marbles: Collecting Masterpieces. The much-anticipated exhibition was originally due to launch in April but the opening was postponed, more than once, due to the covid-19 crisis, with the new…

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Roman fashion fad: Gold earring from Egypt’s Fayum mummy portraits discovered in Roman city Deultum in southeast Bulgaria

An actual ancient gold earring which can be seen depicted in some of the so called Fayum Mummy Portraits from Roman Egypt has been discovered in Southeast Bulgaria by archaeologists excavating the Ancient Roman colony Deultum near the town of Debelt, Burgas District, close to the Black Sea coast. Deultum was a Roman colony, which according to Roman law signified a status equal to that of the city of Rome itself. In today’s Bulgaria, there are only three Roman cities which enjoyed this status – Deultum (Colonia Flavia Pacis Deultensium)…

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Largest non-nuclear explosive blast: Ripple Rock

Half a century ago, sailing the Inside Passage from Seattle to Alaska wasn’t as safe as it is today. A pair of dangerous underwater peaks jointly called Ripple Rock created severe whirlpools in the waters near Vancouver Island, sinking numerous ships and claiming more than 100 lives. It took the largest non-nuclear explosion in history to finally end the threat. Seymour Narrows, the location of Ripple Rock, was a hazard to navigation from the time the first sailing ships began charting the area. Source

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1,200-year-old pagan temple to Thor and Odin unearthed in Norway

The remains of a 1,200-year-old pagan temple to the Old Norse gods such as Thor and Odin have been discovered in Norway — a rare relic of the Viking religion built a few centuries before Christianity became dominant there. Archaeologists say the large wooden building — about 45 feet (14 meters) long, 26 feet (8 m) wide, and up to 40 feet (12 m) high — is thought to date from the end of the eighth century and was used for worship and sacrifices to gods during the midsummer and…

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Armenia, Azerbaijan, Belarus & Ukraine – The Slow Motion Collapse of Soviet Union

By Paul Robinson The sudden collapse of the USSR in 1991 created many weak countries without a unifying national identity and a strong central state. Yet conflicts will continue until the world is willing to recognize the realities on the ground. War between Armenia and Azerbaijan. Violent protests in Kyrgyzstan. Mass demonstrations in Belarus. This month, the countries of the former Soviet Union (FSU) have once again been making headlines. When added to the low-level war in Eastern Ukraine, and the unresolved conflicts in Moldova and Georgia, this recent unrest highlights…

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King Canute and his lost burial clothes

Danish King got enshrined in his own clothes – but appeared with his brothers’ Scientific analysis solve puzzle about the age and destiny of precious silk textiles from AD 1100. The cathedral in Odense, Denmark, has for nine centuries held the relics of the Danish King St. Canute the Holy and his brother Benedikt. They were both murdered here in AD 1086, and just a few years later, in AD 1100, King Canute was sanctified. The history of the relics has been that of turmoil at times, varying from initial…

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China’s 4,000 year old desert mummies with Caucasian features and boat burials

Chinese archaeologists have excavated an extraordinary graveyard in the midst of the terrifying desert north of Tibet. Its people died almost 4,000 years ago, and their remains were well preserved by dry air. The cemetery lies in what is now China’s northwest autonomous region of Xinjiang, yet the people have European features, with brown hair and long noses. Their remains, though lying in one of the world’s largest deserts, are buried in upside-down boats. And where tombstones might stand, declaring pious hope for some god’s mercy in the afterlife, their…

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A tale of two cesspits: DNA reveals intestinal health in Medieval Europe and Middle East

A new study published this week in the journal Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B demonstrates a first attempt at using the methods of ancient bacterial detection, pioneered in studies of past epidemics, to characterise the microbial diversity of ancient gut contents from two medieval latrines. The findings provide insights into the microbiomes of pre-industrial agricultural populations, which may provide much-needed context for interpreting the health of modern microbiomes. Over the years, scientists have noted that those living in industrialised societies have a notably different microbiome compared to hunter-gatherer…

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Curious Bronze Age statuette with ‘tattooed’ face and bone mask found in Siberia

‘Given that the discovery is 5,000 years old, you can imagine how important it is to understand the beliefs of the ancient people populating Siberia’, said Vyacheslav Molodin. Picture: Novosibirsk Institute of Archeology and Ethnography The discovery was made this summer inside the mass burial of people from Odinov culture in Vengerovsky district of Novosibirsk region, Western Siberia. The small – about a palm size – statuette found in situ by the team of Novosibirsk Institute of Archeology and Ethnography had a mask depicting a bear made of a horse…

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The pillars of Gobekli Tepe

Significance: Gobekli Tepe (GT) probably represents the origin of civilisation for most of the world today. Most of us are connected to it in some way, through language, genetics, and religion at least. The Pillars: GT is famous for its anomalous megalithic pillars, and especially the symbols carved on them. Most people think these symbols are telling an important story – they are not just random pictures of animals. Klauss Schmidt, who discovered GT and led its excavation, until his death in 2014, certainly thought so. It follows that the…

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250,000 year old milk tooth found inside Denisova Cave, Siberia

This summer brought the richest harvest of anthropological discoveries to archeologists working at the world-famous Denisova Cave in the south of Siberia. Comment: Meanwhile much of the West ground to a halt with researchers resorting to searching Google maps: Possible lost henge discovered online as lockdown shuts onsite excavations The team of Novosibirsk Institute of Archeology and Ethnography worked in the lowest – the oldest – layers of culture-containing soil in the southern gallery of the cave, dating to 300,000 years ago. Two teeth – a milk and a molar…

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