Stone Age plaque with realistic animal engravings unearthed in cave in Spain

© Josep Curto, Real PressThe 11,700 thousand-year-old archaeological piece that was found by archaeologists. Experts in Spain are perplexed by a mysterious Stone Age plaque with engravings of animals on it. The plaque, believed to be over 11,700 years old, was discovered during the excavation process at the Coves del Fem archeologic dig site last summer. “The team had been working at the site last summer to repair the damage caused by the floods,” said Professor Raquel Pique Huerta, department of Prehistory at the Autonomous University of Barcelona. Coves del…

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An OrWELLSian purge? Why H.G. Wells’ ‘The Shape of Things to Come’ has arrived today

© REUTERS/Ivan Alvarado “It has become apparent that whole masses of human population are, as a whole, inferior in their claim upon the future, to other masses, that they cannot be given opportunities or trusted with power as the superior peoples are trusted, that their characteristic weaknesses are contagious and detrimental to the civilizing fabric, and that their range of incapacity tempts and demoralizes the strong. To give them equality is to sink to their level, to protect and cherish them is to be swamped in their fecundity. ” –…

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Ancient Egyptian funerary temple unveiled south of Cairo

© AP Photo/Nariman El-MoftyA trove of ancient coffins and artifacts on display that Egyptian archaeologist Zahi Hawass and his team unearthed in a vast necropolis, in Saqqara, south of Cairo, Egypt, Sunday, Jan. 17, 2021. Egypt’s former antiquities minister and noted archaeologist Zahi Hawass on Sunday revealed details of an ancient funerary temple in a vast necropolis south of Cairo. Hawass told reporters at the Saqqara necropolis that archaeologists unearthed the temple of Queen Neit, wife of King Teti, the first king of the Sixth Dynasty that ruled Egypt from…

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Debunking pseudoscience on Gobekli Tepe

© 0meer/ShuttestockThe remains of Gobekli Tepe in Turkey. It is one of the oldest settlements in the world. Last September Eric Betz published an article on the Astronomy and Discover websites. These are popular websites, with a lot of readers. Now, I have no idea who Eric is. I think he’s a journalist, not a scientist or archaeologist. But anyway, he wrote this bad article. I contacted the Astronomy website editors to point out its errors but got no response whatsoever. Hence this response. Let’s take a look at what…

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“Exceptional” 2,000-year-old remains of infant and pet dog uncovered in France

© Denis Gliksman/InrapAn overhead view of the burial site in what is now Clermont-Ferrand. French archaeologists have hailed the “exceptional” discovery of the 2,000-year-old remains of a child buried with animal offerings and what appears to have been a pet dog. The child, believed to have been around a year old, was interred at the beginning of the first century, during Roman rule, in a wooden coffin 80cm long made with nails and marked with a decorative iron tag. The coffin was placed in a 2 metre by 1 metre…

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Chinese inventions: The compass, gunpowder … and Critical Social Justice?

My personal area of interest lies in Formosan affairs. Perhaps better known to most as Taiwan, Formosa is the main island of the territory currently occupied by the Republic of China government-in-exile (not to be confused with the Communist-led People’s Republic of China, commonly known as China). As someone born and raised in the US, it is hard to ignore the parallels between our histories. Formosan history is replete with the twists and turns of colonization, rebellion, and the ongoing battle for independence; or, now that there is some semblance…

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Teeth pendants speak of the elk’s prominent status in the Stone Age

© Tom BjorklundA total of 90 elk teeth were placed next to the hips and thighs of the body in grave 127, possibly attached to a garment resembling an apron. There were elk teeth pendants also on the waist. Red ochre had been sprinkled on top of the deceased. Roughly 8,200 years ago, the island of Yuzhniy Oleniy Ostrov in Lake Onega in the Republic of Karelia, Russia, housed a large burial ground where men, women and children of varying ages were buried. Many of the graves contain an abundance…

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New insights from original Domesday survey revealed

© University of OxfordDomesday Book Cover. A new interpretation of the survey behind Domesday Book — the record of conquered England compiled on the orders of William the Conqueror in 1086 — has emerged from a major new study of the survey’s earliest surviving manuscript. Research published in the English Historical Review shows historians now believe Domesday was more efficient, complex, and sophisticated than previously thought. The survey’s first draft, which covered England south of the River Tees, was made with astonishing speed — within 100 days. It was then…

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42,000 year old cave painting in Indonesia may be world’s oldest known figurative artwork

© AA OktavianaDated pig painting at Leang Tedongnge. Scientists have uncovered a pig painting in an Indonesian cave that dates back more than 45,000 years, representing perhaps the world’s oldest surviving animal depiction and the most ancient known figurative artwork. The cave painting may also provide the earliest evidence for anatomically modern humans on the Indonesian island of Sulawesi, supporting the view that the first populations to settle the Wallacea islands created artistic depictions of animals and narrative scenes as part of their culture. Indonesia has been known to harbor…

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Keynes’ Sleight of Hand: From Fabian Eugenicist to World Government High Priest

Under the Keynesian takeover of Bretton Woods Trans-Atlantic nations became increasingly dominated by bloated bureaucratic systems while plans for genuine development were undermined, Matthew Ehret writes. © SCF It is as if the battle lines of civil war have been drawn up between masses of Americans who have been led to believe in either a false “bottom up” approach to economics, as defined by the Austrian School represented by Friedrich von Hayek, or in the “top-down” approach of John Maynard Keynes. The former sacrifices the general welfare of the whole…

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The origins of America’s secret police

© pxhere.com When will the American people realise that the biggest threat to American freedom is not from without but from within its very own walls, where it has been prominently residing for the last 112 years… “Know Thyself, Nothing to Excess, Surety Brings Ruin” – inscribed at the Temple of Apollo at Delphi Many are aware of the Apollo at Delphi inscription and associate it as words of wisdom, after all, the Temple at Delphi was at the center of global intelligence. Kings, emperors, statesmen, generals from all quarters…

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Easter Island’s ‘pigment pits’ call into question societal collapse theory

The actual size of the statues is not as well known Finds of pigment pits after the deforestation of Easter Island reject the earlier presumed societal collapse. A new study on the prehistory of Easter Island (Rapa Nui) by an international team of scientists and archaeologists from Moesgaard Museum in Denmark, Kiel University in Germany, and the University Pompeu Fabra in Spain, has discovered prehistoric pits filled with red pigment on Easter Island. The researchers revealed that the production of reddish pigment continued as an important aspect of the cultural…

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How an Austrian and British Malthusian brainwashed a generation of Americans

© SCF The creation of false opposites has been a long-standing obstacle to human progress. From the ancient pleasure-seeking Epicureans who argued against the logic-heavy Stoics of ancient Rome to the war of “salvation through faith vs works” that schismed western Christianity, to the chaotic emotional energy driving the Jacobin mobs of France whose passions were only matched by the radical Cartesian logic of their Girondin enemies; humanity has long been manipulated by oligarchs who knew how to set the species to war against itself. Although these operations have taken…

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The complex relationship between Marxism and Wokeness

I was recently asked by someone reading my forthcoming book with Helen Pluckrose, Cynical Theories, if I would explain the relationship between Marxism and the Critical Social Justice ideology we trace a partial history of in that book. The reason for the question is that Cynical Theories obviously focuses upon the postmodern elements of Critical Social Justice scholarship and activism, and yet many people, particularly among conservatives, identify obvious relationships to Marxism within that scholarship and activism that seems poorly accounted for by talking about postmodernism. This confusion makes sense…

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Inscription leads archaeologists to tomb of one of the last Han emperors

© Luoyang City Cultural Relics and Archaeology Research InstituteA manufacturing date on a vessel confirmed a Chinese mausoleum’s ties to second-century A.D. ruler Liu Zhi The vessel was produced around the time when Liu Zhi’s successor, Ling, was building a mausoleum for the deceased emperor. Archaeologists say the remains of a stone vessel found in a mausoleum in China’s Henan Province offer near-definitive evidence that second-century A.D. emperor Liu Zhi, known posthumously as Huan, was buried there. “Together with the previous documents about the location of the emperor’s tomb, the…

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4,400 year old Iranian cuneiform-type writing deciphered by French archaeologist

Like the benchmark of Egyptology Jean-François Champollion, he is French. And like him, he managed to decipher a language that has kept its mystery for millennia. François Desset is an archaeologist. He has just decoded linear elamite. A phonetic writing, cuneiform type, found on multiple clay tablets, precisely in the ruins of the ancient city of Susa, in Iran. The country was formerly called Persia and even earlier, 4,500 years ago, kingdom of Elam, hence the name of the writing in question, linear Elamite. This is no small discovery: it…

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2020 the “Worst Year Ever” — you’re joking, right? Here are the real doozies…

Of the lavish banquet of absurdities laid out in 2020, one of the most delectable is Time magazine’s December 14 cover declaring that 2020 was the “worst year ever.” You’re joking, right? In history’s immense tapestry of human misery, it’s not even in the top 100 worst years. Consider 1177 B.C., when many of the great civilizations of the Mediterranean Sea and Mideast collapsed, and the survivors struggled through a pre-modern Dark Ages. This book assembles what is known about this catastrophic era: 1177 B.C.: The Year Civilization Collapsed. Then…

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The gold clad woman and the story of the silk road revealed in ultra-high-status Roman burial in London’s Spitalfields

© MOLAAn artist’s reconstruction of the burial of the Spitalfields Roman woman After 21 years of research, archaeologists have succeeded in piecing together the extraordinary story of an ultra-high-status Roman aristocrat who was buried in London, more than 16 centuries ago. The remarkable evidence, published today, suggests that she may well have been a member of the senatorial elite which presided over the final years of Roman Britain. “It’s conceivable that she was the wife of one of Britain’s last Roman rulers,” said Dr Roger Tomlin, a leading authority on…

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H.G. Wells’ Dystopic Vision Comes Alive With the Great Reset Agenda

In the Time Machine, society one million years in the future has evolved into two separate species called Morlocks and Eloi. The Morlocks represent the ugly dirty producers who by this future age, all live under ground and run the world’s manufacturing. The Eloi are the effect of the inbreeding of the elite, who by this time are simple-minded, Aryan, above-ground dwellers living in idleness and consuming only what the Morlocks produce. What was the trade off? The Morlocks periodically rise above ground in hunting parties to kidnap and eat…

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Why Russia saved the United States from itself

© Maxim Shemetov / Reuters “Whenever the government of the United States shall break up, it will probably be in consequence of a false direction having been given to public opinion. This is the weak point of our defences, and the part to which the enemies of the system will direct all their attacks. Opinion can be so perverted as to cause the false to seem true; the enemy, a friend, and the friend, an enemy; the best interests of the nation to appear insignificant, and trifles of moment; in…

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Mound in Iran could be ancient ruined Achaemenid-era castle

© Tehran Times Tehran – Jelogir Mound, a prehistorical hill situated northward of the UNESCO-tagged Persepolis, may be home to a ruined Achaemenid-era castle, an Iranian archaeologist suggests. “Based on the archaeological evidence that is currently being studied, it can be hypothesized that Jelogir Mound was once home to an Achaemenid castle, which was probably existed in the [subsequent] Sassanid era,” CHTN quoted senior archaeologist Vahid Younesi as saying on Sunday. Younesi, who leads an archaeological survey on the mount, believes pottery fragments scattered at the site are a rich…

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Largest circular tomb in the ancient world that belonged to Emperor Augustus to open

He was the first Roman emperor, who took over from Julius Caesar and built an empire that would eventually stretch from the UK to Egypt, boasting on his death bed that “I found Rome built of bricks, and left it marble.” But the emperor Augustus didn’t exactly get paid in kind when he died in 14CE. His tomb — a huge, circular mausoleum, which was the largest in the city when it was built — was abandoned for centuries. With its roof fallen in and the cypresses planted around it…

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Ancient European hunters carved human bones into weapons for ‘cultural reasons’

© Willy van WingerdenOne of the human bone points analyzed in the study, found by Willy van Wingerden in January of 2017. As the Ice Age waned, melting glaciers drowned the territory of Doggerland, the ground that once connected Britain and mainland Europe. For more than 8,000 years, distinctive weapons — slender, saw-toothed bone points — made by the land’s last inhabitants rested at the bottom of the North Sea. That was until 20th-century engineers, with mechanical dredgers, began scooping up the seafloor and using the sediments to fortify the…

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Unipolar vs Multipolar: The death of McKinley and the loss of America’s soul

© tomorrowsworld.org On December 17, 2020 A new US Maritime strategy was unveiled putting into practice the regressive concepts first outlined in the early National Defense Strategy 2020 doctrine which target China and Russia as the primary enemies of the USA and demanding that the USA be capable to “defeat our adversaries while we accelerate development of a modernized integrated all-domain naval force of the future.” The Pentagon’s Advantages at Sea: Prevailing with Integrated All-Domain Naval Power continued by saying: “China’s and Russia’s revisionist approaches in the maritime environment threaten…

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Celtic gold coin hoard from time Boudicca was at war with the Romans discovered

The birdwatcher, who is in his 50s, initially thought the first coin was an old washer, but quickly discovered it was a gold coin. Experts say each one is worth around £650, and he managed to uncover around 1,300 A birdwatcher has stumbled across a hoard of 2,000-year-old Celtic gold coins worth £800,000 that date back to the time Boudicca was at war with the Romans. The keen metal detectorist, who has not been named, spotted a glint of gold while looking at a buzzard in a recently ploughed field…

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Celtic gold coin hoard discovered from time Boudicca was at war with the Romans

The birdwatcher, who is in his 50s, initially thought the first coin was an old washer, but quickly discovered it was a gold coin. Experts say each one is worth around £650, and he managed to uncover around 1,300 A birdwatcher has stumbled across a hoard of 2,000-year-old Celtic gold coins worth £800,000 that date back to the time Boudicca was at war with the Romans. The keen metal detectorist, who has not been named, spotted a glint of gold while looking at a buzzard in a recently ploughed field…

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Evidence for a massive paleo-tsunami at ancient Tel Dor, Israel

© T. E. LevyGeoprobe drilling rig extraction of a sediment core with evidence of a tsunami from South Bay, Tel Dor, Israel. Underwater excavation, borehole drilling, and modelling suggests a massive paleo-tsunami struck near the ancient settlement of Tel Dor between 9,910 to 9,290 years ago, according to a study published December 23, 2020 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Gilad Shtienberg, Richard Norris and Thomas Levy from the Scripps Center for Marine Archaeology, University of California, San Diego, U.S., and colleagues from Utah State University and the University…

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