Archaeologists call find at Brú na Bóinne World Heritage Site ‘another Newgrange’

The Brú na Bóinne World Heritage Site has added to its importance with further megalithic burial chambers discovered. Archaeologists in Ireland made a major new discovery in July 2018, revealing a 5,500-year-old megalithic passage tomb cemetery that is being described as a “find of a lifetime.” Following research carried out by agri-technology company Devenish and University College Dublin School of Archaeology, two burial chambers have been discovered within the western part of the main passage tomb beside the 18th-century Dowth Hall in Co. Meath. The chambers were covered by a…

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Prehistoric artifacts suggest a Neolithic Era independently developed in New Guinea

New artifacts uncovered at the Waim archaeological site in the highlands of New Guinea – including a fragment of the earliest symbolic stone carving in Oceania – illustrate a shift in human behavior between 5050 and 4200 years ago in response to the widespread emergence of agriculture, ushering in a regional Neolithic Era similar to the Neolithic in Eurasia. The location and pattern of the artifacts at the site suggest a fixed domestic space and symbolic cultural practices, hinting that the region began to independently develop hallmarks of the Neolithic…

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Scientists agree: Younger Dryas impact event wiped out ancient civilization

The Earth was hit by a fragmented comet around 13,000 years ago at the end of the Pleistocene Era and scientists are now starting to agree. A new research paper has been published in Scientific Reports regarding an ancient civilisation in what is modern-day Syria that was wiped out by the cataclysm, as academics finally come round to the idea that yes this event did happen. Even the sceptic Michael Shermer, who famously debated Graham Hancock on the Joe Rogan podcast has tweeted Graham saying: “Ok Graham, I shall adjust…

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Pepe Escobar – A meeting of Chinese and Greek/Latin stoicism

Earlier this week a delegation of Chinese medics arrived at Malpensa airport near Milan from Shanghai on a special China Eastern flight carrying 400,000 masks and 17 tons of equipment. The salutation banner the visitors rolled out on the tarmac, in red and white, read, “We’re waves from the same sea, leaves from the same tree, flowers from the same garden.” In a stance of supreme cross-cultural elegance, this was inspired by the poetics of Seneca, a Stoic. The impact, all over Italy, where people still study the classics, was…

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How the Soviet Union defeated a smallpox epidemic in a matter of 19 days

It took the city emergency services a little more than two weeks to prevent the deadly virus from escaping beyond Moscow and spreading throughout the entire Soviet Union. On December 23, 1959, a man stepped off an airplane arriving in Moscow from Delhi, who would soon inadvertently place the capital of the USSR in great danger. Artist Alexei Kokorekin could not have imagined that he had brought smallpox from India. Variola vera, natural or smallpox, was one of the deadliest diseases to have ever affected humankind. It wiped out entire…

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General Smedley Butler and the ‘Wall Street Putsch’ against President Roosevelt revisited

The upcoming American elections are just around the corner and everyone is wondering if the new president will be named Trump, Biden, Sanders or none of the above. I can hear the incredulous reader exclaim: Wait, what does “none of the above” mean?? It’s certainly going to be one of those three isn’t it?? It is often too easy to lose sight of the forest for the trees and in the opinion-packed world of endless talking head commentaries, every leaf and branch is scrutinized by professional opinionators so closely that…

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Global human genomes reveal rich genetic diversity shaped by complex history

A new study has provided the most comprehensive analysis of human genetic diversity to date, after the sequencing of 929 human genomes by scientists at the Wellcome Sanger Institute, the University of Cambridge and their collaborators. The study uncovers a large amount of previously undescribed genetic variation and provides new insights into our evolutionary past, highlighting the complexity of the process through which our ancestors diversified, migrated and mixed throughout the world. The resource, published in Science (20 March), is the most detailed representation of the genetic diversity of worldwide…

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Oldest modern bird fossil discovered, nicknamed the ‘wonderchicken’

Experts have discovered a fossil of the world’s oldest known modern bird – a diminutive creature about half the size of a mallard duck. Dubbed the Wonderchicken, the remains were found in rocks dating to about 66.8m to 66.7m years ago, revealing that the bird was active shortly before the asteroid strike that wiped out the dinosaurs 66m years ago. “This is the oldest evidence of modern birds that we have so far,” said Dr Daniel Field, of the University of Cambridge, an avian palaeontologist and co-author of the research.…

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Chaco Canyon: The life and death of one of America’s most mysterious trees

A majestic ponderosa pine, standing tall in what is widely thought to have been the “center of the world” for the Ancestral Puebloan people, may have more mundane origins than previously believed, according to research led by tree-ring experts at the University of Arizona. A study published in the journal American Antiquity provides new data that calls into question the long-held view of the Plaza Tree of Pueblo Bonito as the sole living tree in an otherwise treeless landscape, around which a regional metropolis in New Mexico’s Chaco Canyon was…

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The legend and the truth about St. Patrick’s Day

In 1997, my students and I traveled to Croagh Patrick, a mountain in County Mayo, as part of a study abroad program course on Irish literature I was teaching for the University of Dayton. I wanted my students to visit the place where, each July, thousands of pilgrims pay homage to St. Patrick, who, according to lore, fasted and prayed on the summit for 40 days. While there, our tour guide relayed the story of how St. Patrick, as he lay on his death bed on March 17 in A.D.…

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Long lost ancient Maya kingdom unearthed in a backyard in Mexico

Associate professor of anthropology Charles Golden and his colleagues have found the long-lost capital of an ancient Maya kingdom in the backyard of a Mexican cattle rancher. Golden, in collaboration with Brown University bioarchaeologist Andrew Scherer and a team of researchers from Mexico, Canada and the United States, began excavating the site in June 2018. Among their findings is a trove of Maya monuments, one of which has an important inscription describing rituals, battles, a mythical water serpent and the dance of a rain god. They’ve also found remnants of…

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BEST OF THE WEB: Mysterious 25,000-year-old circular structure built from bones of 60 mammoths discovered in Russia’s forest steppe

A jaw-dropping example of Ice Age architecture has been unearthed on Russia’s forest steppe: a huge, circular structure built with the bones of at least 60 woolly mammoths. But exactly why hunter-gatherers enduring the frigid realities of life 25,000 years ago would construct the 40-foot diameter building is a fascinating question. Comment: It is perhaps (a little) less perplexing when you realise that back then the area wasn’t “frigid” at all and in fact its climate was temperate. See Pierre Lescaudron’s Of Flash Frozen Mammoths and Cosmic Catastrophes for more.…

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Standing at the precipice of a financial collapse: Time for a 21st century Pecora commission

As Republican and democrat politicians hold emergency meetings to decide how to avoid a meltdown of Wall Street, the smell of hyperinflation looms in the air as much today as it did in Germany during the opening months of 1922. This week, markets were propped up by a record breaking offering of $1.5 Trillion in liquidity injections over the coming months (added to the $9 trillion already injected over the past six months), and rather than deal with the real reasons for this oncoming financial collapse, the media has brainwashed…

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Ancient Indonesian rock art discovered

Two pocket-sized stone artworks found in an ancient pile of Indonesian cave rubbish have put the out-dated notion that Europe was the cradle of artistic expression on ever shakier ground. The stone ‘plaquettes’ were unearthed by a team of Australian and Indonesian archaeologists working in the Leang Bulu Bettue cave, one of the dozens of caves scattered across the limestone-rich southern part of Sulawesi in central Indonesia. They published their discovery in the journal Nature: Human Behaviour. One is etched with the outline of the head and upper body of…

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Depicting plasma? Ancient ‘mantis-man’ petroglyph discovered in Iran

A unique rock carving found in the Teymareh rock art site (Khomein county) in Central Iran with six limbs has been described as part man, part mantis. Rock carvings, or petroglyphs, of invertebrate animals are rare, so entomologists teamed up with archaeologists to try and identify the motif. They compared the carving with others around the world and with the local six-legged creatures which its prehistoric artists could have encountered. Entomologists Mahmood Kolnegari, Islamic Azad University of Arak, Iran; Mandana Hazrati, Avaye Dornaye Khakestari Institute, Iran; and Matan Shelomi, National…

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‘Dead Sea Scrolls’ at the Museum of the Bible are ALL forgeries

On the fourth floor of the Museum of the Bible, a sweeping permanent exhibit tells the story of how the ancient scripture became the world’s most popular book. A warmly lit sanctum at the exhibit’s heart reveals some of the museum’s most prized possessions: fragments of the Dead Sea Scrolls, ancient texts that include the oldest known surviving copies of the Hebrew Bible. But now, the Washington, D.C. museum has confirmed a bitter truth about the fragments’ authenticity. On Friday, independent researchers funded by the Museum of the Bible announced…

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Coronavirus and the sun: A lesson from the 1918 influenza pandemic

Fresh air, sunlight and improvised face masks seemed to work a century ago; and they might help us now. When new, virulent diseases emerge, such SARS and Covid-19, the race begins to find new vaccines and treatments for those affected. As the current crisis unfolds, governments are enforcing quarantine and isolation, and public gatherings are being discouraged. Health officials took the same approach 100 years ago, when influenza was spreading around the world. The results were mixed. But records from the 1918 pandemic suggest one technique for dealing with influenza…

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Churchill’s secret WWII army bunker discovered

A clandestine bunker used by Britain’s most secretive soldiers during World War II – an elite unit commonly known as ‘Churchill’s secret army’ – was recently discovered in southern Scotland by forestry workers. The fortified hideout stretches about 23 feet long (7 meters) and is 10 feet wide (3 meters), the Daily Mail reported, citing archaeologists. According to the media report, forestry workers in south Edinburgh uncovered the bunker buried four feet (1,5 meters) underground and consisting primarily of a tin roof and brick walls. Archaeologists suggested that the bunker…

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El Algar: Life in hilltop Iberian Bronze Age societies revealed in new analysis

The El Algar society thrived in complex hilltop settlements across the Iberian Peninsula from 2200-1550 cal BCE, and gravesites and settlement layouts provide strong evidence of a marked social hierarchy. Knipper and colleagues conducted carbon and nitrogen isotope analysis at two different El Algar hilltop settlements: the large fortified urban site La Bastida (in present-day Totana, Murcia), and the smaller settlement Gatas (Turre, Almería). Their sample included remains of 75 human individuals from across social strata, 28 bones from domestic animals and wild deer, charred barley (75 grains total), and…

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The Long Roots of Our Russophobia

For the last five years, the American media has been filled with scurrilous articles demonizing Russian President Vladimir Putin. Putin has been accused of every crime imaginable, from shooting down airplanes, to assassinating opponents, to invading neighboring countries, to stealing money to manipulating the U.S. president and helping to rig the 2016 election. Few of the accusations directed against Putin have ever been substantiated and the quality of journalism has been at the level of “yellow journalism.” In a desperate attempt to sustain their political careers, centrist Democrats like Joe…

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The Great Lake Tahoe comet tsunami

One of the best things about the Younger Dryas Impact Hypothesis is finding catastrophic features that may date to the event, but have not yet been directly connected with it. Today I submit one of the finest examples: The Great Lake Tahoe Comet Tsunami. Its is a well-published and uncontroversial fact that in the recent prehistoric past a gargantuan rock shelf on the western shore of Lake Tahoe collapsed. FIVE SQUARE MILES of rock and sediment slipped into the gin-clear waters of the deep alpine lake and vomited a 300′…

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How the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms became corrupt and abusive

It’s unlikely that there is a single federal alphabet organization less popular among the readership of this website than the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms. These are the people who gave us both the Siege at Ruby Ridge and the Siege of Waco. What’s more, they may well be engaged in an entirely unconstitutional exercise: monitoring and patrolling the gun ownership of law-abiding citizens. There’s also a solid case to be made that the ATF is a rogue organization, the most corrupt of the federal alphabet agencies. This can…

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“Open, iceless seas” in the North Pole described by Dutch sailors in wooden ships in 1665

I [Harry Hardrada] recently unearthed an intriguing piece of literature from a 19th century periodical named ‘Ho! For the Pole!’ in Littell’s Living Age, Volume 66 (1860). The paper highlights various voyages to the North Pole throughout the 17th-18th centuries with meticulous detail. It appears, according to the article, that many wooden ships penetrated as far north as the 89th latitude in ‘open iceless seas’ during this time — as in 1665 and 1675. A bit far-fetched? Perhaps, on the face of it… but there is some good evidence out…

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Intern unearths spectacular, 2,000-year-old Roman dagger in Germany

As far as internships go, Nico Calman arguably had an especially good one. During his stint with the Westphalie Department for the Preservation and Care of Field Monuments in Germany last year, 19-year-old Calman unearthed a 2,000-year-old silver dagger that may have helped the Romans wage war against a Germanic tribe in the first century A.D. Discovered still in its sheath in the grave of a soldier at the archaeological site of Haltern am See (Haltern at the Lake), the weapon was nearly unrecognizable thanks to centuries of corrosion. But…

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Astronomers Detect Largest Explosion in the History of the Universe Since the Big Bang Itself

Aaron Kesel, The Mind Unleashed Waking Times Astronomers in Perth, Australia recently detected and observed the largest explosion ever found in the universe since the Big Bang, according to a study published in the Astrophysics Journal. “We’ve seen outbursts in the centers of galaxies before but this one is really, really massive,” said Curtin University professor Melanie Johnston-Hollitt. “And we don’t know why it’s so big. But it happened very slowly—like an explosion in slow motion that took place over hundreds of millions of years.” Researchers at the Curtin University International Centre for Radio Astronomy were…

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Prehistory revisited – Agriculture first versus Göbekli Tepe

Discovering the origin of civilisation is the holy grail of anthropology and archaeology. Essentially, this means understanding how man transformed from un-civilised Palaeolithic hunter gatherers to civilised Neolithic specialists dependent on agriculture. It used to be thought that agriculture itself was the key to this transition, as it enabled larger communities to settle in one place and develop the specialities that signal the arrival of civilisation. No longer was the desperate search for food an all-consuming activity that forced people to continually migrate like animals. And since agriculture is thought…

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More evidence of cosmic impact that destroyed human settlement in Syria 12,800 years ago

Before the Taqba Dam impounded the Euphrates River in northern Syria in the 1970s, an archaeological site named Abu Hureyra bore witness to the moment ancient nomadic people first settled down and started cultivating crops. A large mound marks the settlement, which now lies under Lake Assad. But before the lake formed, archaeologists were able to carefully extract and describe much material, including parts of houses, food and tools — an abundance of evidence that allowed them to identify the transition to agriculture nearly 12,800 years ago. It was one…

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A brief and horrific history of biological weapons and warfare

The US government and its many agencies and educational and health institutions, have for many decades conducted intensive research into biological warfare, in many cases strongly focused on race-specific pathogens. In a report to the US Congress, the Department of Defense revealed that its program of creating artificial biological agents included modifying non-fatal viruses to make them lethal, and genetic engineering to alter the immunology of biological agents to make treatment and vaccinations impossible. The military report admitted that at the time it operated about 130 bio-weapons research facilities, dozens…

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Forced assimilation of native American children

In the 19th and 20th centuries, the United States government used family separation and schools to try to erase Native American children’s traditional cultures and languages. A newly published archive of photographs visually documents some Indigenous peoples’ struggle for survival. In May 2018, U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions announced that the government would begin to separate children from their families who had crossed from Mexico into the United States. More than 5,000 children were torn from their relatives. Tragically, this is not the first time the U.S. government has systematically…

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