Ancient skeletons with cranial deformation unearthed in Croatia

© M Kavka/CC By 4.0CT scans of the skull that had a “circular-erect”deformation Archaeologists have unearthed three ancient skeletons in Croatia — and two of them had pointy, artificially deformed skulls. Each of those skulls had been melded into a different shape, possibly as a way to show they belonged to a specific cultural group. Artificial cranial deformation has been practiced in various parts of the world, from Eurasia and Africa to South America. It is the practice of shaping a person’s skull — such as through using tight headdresses,…

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Armenian find shows innovation in Stone Age tools more than 300,000 years was local, not imported

© Dan AdlerThis image shows stone tools found at the site of Nor Geghi, Armenia: top – biface tool; bottom – a Levallois core. The analysis of artifacts from a 325,000-year-old site in Armenia shows that human technological innovation occurred intermittently throughout the Old World, rather than spreading from a single point of origin, as previously thought. The study, published today in the journal Science, examines thousands of stone artifacts retrieved from Nor Geghi 1, a unique site preserved between two lava flows dated to 200,000-400,000 years ago. Layers of…

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Diverse DNA deepens mystery of 800 skeletons at Roopkund lake – does folk song hold clue?

© Atish WaghwaseThis composite image made of multiple photographs shows Roopkund Lake and the surrounding mountains. Roopkund, a remote lake high in the Indian Himalaya, is home to one of archaeology’s spookiest mysteries: the skeletons of as many as 800 people. Now, a study published today in Nature Communications attempts to unravel what happened at “Skeleton Lake” — but the results raise more questions than answers. In the early 2000s, preliminary DNA studies had suggested that the people who died at Roopkund were of South Asian ancestry, and radiocarbon dates…

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Epstein madam Ghislaine Maxwell’s host of family skeletons

© James Andanson/GettyThe Maxwell family Ghislaine Maxwell, 57, comes from a family by turns brilliant and accomplished, deceptive and doomed. Her backstory is full of sex and science, money and magical illusions. And today she is the world’s most wanted woman — at least by the media and Jeffrey Epstein’s victims. She is the youngest child of the notorious and disgraced British media mogul Robert Maxwell, rumored after his mysterious death in 1991 to have been an Israeli spy. She was the alleged paramour-turned-pimp for Jeffrey Epstein, the billionaire pedophile…

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8,000 year old haunting stone faces from “city” on the Danube river baffle archeologists

© Mickey Mystique/Wikimedia CommonsThe strange statues have been declared ‘fish-like’ MYSTERIOUS sculptures with “haunting faces” that date back 8,000 years have left archaeologists baffled. The strange human figurines found in Serbia have bizarre fish-like features – but there’s no telly exactly who made them, or why. Carved by ancient Europeans on the banks of the Danube river, the sculptures represent a little-known period of history. They were sculpted over a period of around 200 years at a long-lost Serbian settlement known as Lepenski Vir. The site was first inhabited more…

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Humans migrated to Mongolia much earlier than previously believed says new study

© University of California, DavisAncient tools were found in a site in the western flank of the Tolbor Valley. Stone tools uncovered in Mongolia by an international team of archaeologists indicate that modern humans traveled across the Eurasian steppe about 45,000 years ago, according to a new University of California, Davis, study. The date is about 10,000 years earlier than archaeologists previously believed. The site also points to a new location for where modern humans may have first encountered their mysterious cousins, the now extinct Denisovans, said Nicolas Zwyns, an…

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Pioneering UN leader Dag Hammarskjold was assassinated, new data suggests

© UNBivši glavni tajnik UN-a Dag Hammarskjöld Updated:Aug 16, 2019Original:Aug 16, 2019UN Leader Dag Hammarskjold Died in Mysterious Circumstances in 1961. What Really Happened?New evidence supports a theory that the pioneering U.N. secretary general was assassinated. Shortly after midnight on September 18, 1961, a chartered DC-6 airplane carrying United Nations Secretary-General Dag Hammarskjold on a peacekeeping mission to the newly independent African nation of the Congo crashed in a forest near Ndola, in the British protectorate of Northern Rhodesia (now Zambia). Hammarskjold and 14 other people aboard, including U.N. staffers…

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Bronze Age Britons were riddled with parasites but had the finest of fabrics

© (D Webb, Cambridge Archaeological Unit)People living in houses perched on freshwater marshes were infected by intestinal worms caught from foraging for food in lakes. Artifacts from the houses such as food, clothes and jewellery were preserved in the mud Bronze Age Britons were infected with a number of parasites including giant kidney worms that could reach up to one metre in length, analysis of 3,000-year-old faeces has revealed. Prehistoric people living in a settlement perched on freshwater marshes in eastern England were infected by intestinal worms caught from foraging…

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Lascaux Shaft Scene and cometary impacts

The Lascaux shaft scene is perhaps the most iconic of all European Palaeolithic cave artworks (see below). It shows a bison and human, apparently both dying and normally interpreted as a hunting scene. But we now know, beyond any reasonable doubt, the animal symbols represent constellations, and the Shaft Scene in particular very likely represents a date using precession of the equinoxes. © Copy of the Lascaux Shaft Scene, courtesy of Alistair Coombs Using the zodiacal method and our ancient zodiac, the date ‘written’ in the scene is between 15,300…

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Before there was Epstein: Kingpins of the Caribbean

© Corey’s Diggs Epstein is not the first kingpin of the Caribbean. In fact, there were many before him. This is the hidden history of CIA black ops in the Caribbean – from No Name Key to Norman’s Cay to Disney’s Castaway Cay and beyond. Operation 40, a CIA sponsored hit squad in the 1960s, was a “mixed group of Cuban exiles, Italian wise guys, and square-jawed military intelligence types.” Created under Eisenhower in March 1960, controlled under VP Nixon, and funded by George HW Bush, this secretive team has…

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Half of Neanderthals got ‘surfer’s ear’

© Erik TrinkausThe La Chapelle-aux-Saints Neandertal skull, with the external auditory exostoses (“swimmer’s ear” growths) in the left canal indicated. What do surfers, kayakers and Neanderthals have in common? New research published Wednesday revealed that abnormal bony growths in the ear canal, also called “surfer’s ear” and often seen in people who take part in water sports in colder climates, occurred frequently in our ancient cousins who died out around 40,000 years ago. But unless Neanderthals were righteous dudes searching for the perfect wave, the findings may mean they fished…

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Half of Neanderthals also got ‘surfer’s ear’

© Erik TrinkausThe La Chapelle-aux-Saints Neandertal skull, with the external auditory exostoses (“swimmer’s ear” growths) in the left canal indicated. What do surfers, kayakers and Neanderthals have in common? New research published Wednesday revealed that abnormal bony growths in the ear canal, also called “surfer’s ear” and often seen in people who take part in water sports in colder climates, occurred frequently in our ancient cousins who died out around 40,000 years ago. But unless Neanderthals were righteous dudes searching for the perfect wave, the findings may mean they fished…

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‘Ghosts’ of 2 unknown extinct human species found in modern DNA

© João Teixeira When modern humans started emerging from Africa and spreading throughout Eurasia, they found many places already occupied by older hominins such as Neanderthals and Denisovans. As humans do, we got rather friendly with our new neighbours: evidence of that hanky panky lives on in our DNA today. But we’re also starting to find glimpses of something strange in our neighbourhoods – traces of ancient, unknown hominins that we’ve never seen before. “Each of us carry within ourselves the genetic traces of these past mixing events,” said biologist…

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The genocide pit at Sacred Ridge, Colorado

© via Science NewsGenocide at Sacred Ridge: Excavations at an ancient Pueblo site uncovered crushed skulls (one shown) and other bones from at least 35 victims. “Mutilated and processed” is not a phrase that you ever hope to read in any context whatsoever. But it fits good to Sacred Ridge in Colorado, an ancient Native American settlement consisting of 22 pit houses. One day, as archeologists were cataloging the usual pots and tools and petrified turds and such, they stumbled straight into a problem: scientists didn’t have enough room on…

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Biowarfare, Nazi scientists and the creation of Lyme Disease in the US

Plum Island Lab “Pentagon May Have Released Weaponized Ticks That Helped Spread of Lyme Disease: Investigation Ordered” was the Newsweek headline last month. The article below it was about the U.S. House of Representatives having “quietly passed a bill requiring the Inspector General of the Department of Defense to conduct a review into whether the Pentagon experimented with ticks and other blood-sucking insects for use as biological weapons between 1950 and 1975.” The article continued: “If the Inspector General finds that such experiments occurred, then, according to the bill, they…

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‘Sorcerer’s treasure trove’ uncovered in Pompeii by archaeologists

© EPAMost of the artefacts would have belonged to women – possibly slaves or servants Archaeologists working in the buried Roman city of Pompeii say they have uncovered a “sorcerer’s treasure trove” of artefacts, including good-luck charms, mirrors and glass beads. Most of the items would have belonged to women, said Massimo Osanna, director of the Archaeological Park of Pompeii. A room with the bodies of 10 victims, including women and children, was excavated in the same house. Pompeii was engulfed by a volcanic eruption from Mt Vesuvius in AD…

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FLASHBACK: Myth of pristine Amazon rainforest busted as old cities reappear

© Mario Tama/GettyDreamscape: the Amazon was once lined with fields and plazas The first Europeans to penetrate the Amazon rainforests reported cities, roads and fertile fields along the banks of its major rivers. “There was one town that stretched for 15 miles without any space from house to house, which was a marvellous thing to behold,” wrote Gaspar de Carvajal, chronicler of explorer and conquistador Francisco de Orellana in 1542. “The land is as fertile and as normal in appearance as our Spain.” Such tales were long dismissed as fantasies,…

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350,000 years old stone axes discovered in Karain Cave, Turkey

© Arkeolojik Haber 350,000 years old axes, found at Antalya’s Karain Cave to unearth more ancient historical facts Archaeologists in Turkey have discovered the world’s second oldest axe, at Antalya’s Karain Cave, believed to be 350,000 years old. The Paleolithic archaeological site is located at Yagca Village 27 kilometers (17 miles) northwest of Antalya city in the Mediterranean region of Turkey. Harun Taskiran, a professor at the Department of Archeology in Ankara University, said during the excavation process, they have found a sharp, two sided axe, equaling more or less…

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Humans occupied Ethiopian highlands more than 30,000 years ago – Lowlands had become too dry

© H VEITBoulders were deposited by a glacier in the Harcha Valley, in Ethiopia’s Bale Mountains, during the last glacial period. A rock shelter located in the hostile environment of southern Ethiopia’s Bale Mountains has pushed back high-altitude living into the middle stone age. The Fincha Habera site, 3500 metres above sea level, shows evidence of human occupation at least 31,000 years ago and as far back as 47,000 years ago, according to a new study published in the journal Science. The Bale Mountains, like other high-altitude regions, including the…

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You say what you eat: How diet changed language

© (Courtesy David Frayer, University of Kansas; Karin Wiltschke-Schrotta, Naturhistorisches Museum Wien)Edge-to-edge bite (left), Upper Paleolithic skull, Arene Candide cave, Italy; Overbite (right), Early Bronze Age skull, Hainburg, Austria Try saying “f” and “v” and pay close attention to your lower lip and upper teeth. Would it surprise you to learn that these sounds are relatively recent additions to human languages? Languages, of course, develop over time as usage, meaning, and pronunciation change. But what about the ways our bodies have changed over the millennia? Could this also contribute to…

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US bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki were not to end WWII, they were to intimidate the Soviet Union

© AFPDevastated city of Nagasaki after an atomic bomb was dropped by a US Air Force B-29 on August 9, 1945. Almost three-quarters of a century ago on August 9, 1945, the United States dropped a 22-kiloton plutonium bomb called the “Fat Man” on Nagasaki. The total destruction of that city, and the instant incineration of 40,000 mostly civilian people, occurred just three days after the destruction of Hiroshima by a 15-kiloton uranium bomb, which instantly killed 70,000. This criminal one-two punch by the US launched the atomic age. The…

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‘Sensational’ find: First ever ancient male rhino skull discovered in Russia’s Sinaya Balka volcano

© Azov Historical-Archaeological and Paleontological Museum-Reserve In a “sensational” find, Russian paleontologists carrying out excavations on the Taman Peninsula have announced the first ever discovery of an ancient male rhinoceros’ skull. The Caucasian Elasmotherium skull, which is in remarkably good condition, was found encased in the ancient mud of the Sinaya Balka volcano in southern Russia’s Krasnodar Region. Its discovery was hailed by Vadim Titov, a lead researcher at the Southern Scientific Center of the Russian Academy of Sciences. This year we found the remains of about a dozen elephants…

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Ancient Maya practiced ‘total war’ well before climate stress

© Photograph by DEA/G. DAGLI ORTI/De Agostini/GettyScholars have widely assumed that the Maya practiced “total war”—that is, devastating violence that involved the destruction of cities—only after they began to compete for food resources during a series of droughts beginning in the 9th century A.D. Scholars have widely assumed that the Maya practiced “total war” — that is, devastating violence that involved the destruction of cities — only after they began to compete for food resources during a series of droughts beginning in the 9th century A.D. A long-standing idea about…

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BEST OF THE WEB: Why are Western leaders gawd awful bad and China’s so darn competent?

In the first part of this essay, I showed why Western leaders are generally so bad. The one sentence answer is they are almost always suborned to serve the interests of the 1% at the expense of the 99%. There is a corollary explanation for this. European cultures and their spinoffs in the rest of Eurangloland, including Israel are founded on violence and theft. If you don’t believe this goes back to the Jewish Torah/Christian Old Testament, here is a quick review of Westerners’ predilection for killing, destroying, plundering first…

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Humans occupied Ethiopian highlands more than 30,000 years ago

© H VEITBoulders were deposited by a glacier in the Harcha Valley, in Ethiopia’s Bale Mountains, during the last glacial period. A rock shelter located in the hostile environment of southern Ethiopia’s Bale Mountains has pushed back high-altitude living into the middle stone age. The Fincha Habera site, 3500 metres above sea level, shows evidence of human occupation at least 31,000 years ago and as far back as 47,000 years ago, according to a new study published in the journal Science. The Bale Mountains, like other high-altitude regions, including the…

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Lest we forget? Western amnesia about Soviet role in WWII victory has some disturbing aspects…

© SputnikResidents of liberated Sofia greeting Red Army soldiers. 09.09.1944 In the autumn of 1944, 75 years ago, the Red Army reached the borders of the German Reich; cities such as Minsk, Vilnius, and Brest having been liberated in July as Soviet forces swept West. Today, the Russian Federation celebrates these victories with the same emotion and pride as Western allies celebrate the Normandy landings and the subsequent battle for France, which occurred at the same time. Yet, certain EU countries, notably the Baltic states, have called these Russian celebrations…

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Bombing Hiroshima changed the world, but it didn’t end WWII

© Associated PressA photo taken July 16, 1945 shows an aerial view after the first atomic explosion at the Trinity Test site in New Mexico. President Obama’s visit to Hiroshima on Friday has rekindled public debate about the U.S. atomic bombings of Japan — one largely suppressed since the Smithsonian canceled its Enola Gay exhibit in 1995. Obama, aware that his critics are ready to pounce if he casts the slightest doubt on the rectitude of President Harry S. Truman’s decision to use atomic bombs, has opted to remain silent…

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The Dyatlov Pass incident: Who or what killed the Russian hikers? RT investigates

© RuptlyDyatlov Pass Exactly 60 years after the mutilated and half-naked bodies of seven hikers were found on the snowy slopes of the Ural Mountains, a Ruptly crew travels to the Dyatlov Pass to try and shed a new light on the coldest of cold cases. CAUTION: STORY CONTAINS DISTURBING IMAGES As it greets the cameras, the landscape of what has long been known by local Mansi tribesmen as Deadly Mountain is as bleak and snow-covered as it was when the seven men and two women under the command of…

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