Hunt for remains of 16th century Irish rebel lord in Spain unearths several skeletons

Spanish archaeologists may have uncovered the final resting place of an Irish nobleman whose bloody 16th-century rebellion almost toppled Ireland’s English rulers. With some Spanish support, Red Hugh O’Donnell waged war against the English for nine years before his rebels suffered a defeat at the 1602 Battle of Kinsale. He escaped to Spain, hoping to secure King Philip III’s backing for a renewed assault. But Philip was uninterested and O’Donnell died shortly before his 30th birthday near Valladolid, the site of the Spanish court at the time. Source

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SOTT FOCUS: MindMatters: Exploring Flatland: A Romance of Hyperdimensional Space

Before Orwell’s masterpiece novel, 1984, about a dystopian society and what politically motivated and propaganda-induced groupthink looked and sounded like, another Englishman by the name of Edwin Abbott Abbott wrote a semi-satirical, allegorical sci-fi novella called Flatland: A Romance of Many Dimensions, in 1884. In his story, Abbott ingeniously uses flat geometric shapes to represent different strata of society in his contemporary experience of Victorian England. Taking aim at his era’s biases, prejudices and social mores, Abbott satirizes the thought processes and modes of oppression towards those who would begin…

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Canaanite DNA shows waves of migration from Caucasus Mountains, lives on in modern Arabs and Jews

Tel Megiddo was an important Canaanite city state during the Bronze Age, approximately 3500 B.C. to 1200 B.C. DNA analysis reveals that the city’s population included migrants from the distant Caucasus Mountains. A new study of ancient DNA traces the surprising heritage of these mysterious Bronze Age people. They are best known as the people who lived “in a land flowing with milk and honey” until they were vanquished by the ancient Israelites and disappeared from history. But a scientific report published today reveals that the genetic heritage of the…

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Ancient accounts of ‘Death from Above’

When we stargaze, we bask in photons that have traveled for many millennia before reaching our eyes. To us, the stars appear fixed on a so-called celestial sphere that encapsulates our entire earthly existence. The truth, of course, is that no such sphere exists. Instead, stars and galaxies are scattered through the cosmos at distances so great they’re incomprehensible to us. But not all celestial phenomena exist so far away. Every day, shooting stars fail to recognize a boundary between space and Earth, dropping rocks from above — and often…

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How the British Empire created and then killed George Orwell

The British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC), happily amplified by the Public Broadcasting System (PBS) in the United States which carries its World News, continues to pump out its regular dreck about the alleged economic chaos in Russia and the imagined miserable state of the Russian people. It is all lies of course. Patrick Armstrong’s authoritative regular updates including his reports on this website are a necessary corrective to such crude propaganda. But amid all their countless fiascoes and failures in every other field (including the highest per capita death rate from…

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Pristine, ancient Roman mosaic floor unearthed beneath Italian vineyard

A perfectly preserved ancient Roman mosaic floor has been discovered near the northern Italian city of Verona. Archaeologists were astonished by the find as it came almost a century after the remains of a villa, believed to date to the 3rd century AD, were unearthed in a hilly area above the town of Negrar di Valpolicella. After the discovery in 1922, the site was mostly left abandoned until a team from the Superintendent of Archaeology, Fine Arts and Landscape of Verona resumed digging last summer. The team returned to the…

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A look at the dirty history of soap

“Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds.” That’s what the CDC has advised all Americans to do to prevent the spread of COVID-19 during this pandemic. It’s common-sense advice. The surfactants found in soap lift germs from the skin, and water then washes them away. Soap is inexpensive and ubiquitous; it’s a consumer product found in every household across the country. Yet few people know the long and dirty history of making soap, the product we all rely on to clean our skin. I’m…

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Ancient genomes reveal 7,000 years of demographic history in France

According to new genomic analysis, France was populated by a pair of ancient migrations: the first during the Neolithic period, roughly 6,300 years ago, and the second during the Bronze Age, some 4,200 years ago. “There were almost no data from ancient populations on the territory of present-day France and our study begins to fill a gap that leads to a clearer picture of the evolution of populations throughout Europe,” Eva-Maria Geigl, a researcher with the Jacques Monod Institute in Paris, told UPI in an email. For the new study,…

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Drones cast new light on mystery of Nazca Lines Archaeology

An aerial search in the Peruvian desert has revealed intriguing figures of humans and animals that predate the nearby Unesco world heritage site A faded decades-old black-and-white photograph was the only lead Johny Isla had when he set out on the trail of a sea monster. The Peruvian archaeologist spotted the image at a 2014 exhibition in Germany about the Nazca Lines, the vast and intricate desert images which attract tens of thousands of tourists every year. The photograph taken in the early 1970s showed a mysterious killer whale deity…

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Bones of 60 mammoths found near human-built traps in Mexico

Archaeologists have found the bones of about 60 mammoths at an airport under construction just north of Mexico City, near human-built “traps” where more than a dozen mammoths were found last year. Both discoveries reveal how appealing the area – once a shallow lake – was for the mammoths, and how erroneous was the classic vision of groups of fur-clad hunters with spears chasing mammoths across a plain. For the moment, however, Mexican archaeologists are facing a surfeit of mammoths, almost too many to ever excavate. “There are too many,…

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BEST OF THE WEB: Did psychopath Rockefeller create the Spanish Flu pandemic of 1918?

It Started with the Rockefeller Institute’s Crude Bacterial Meningitis Vaccination Experiment on US Troops. The 1918-19 bacterial vaccine experiment may have killed 50-100 million people. What if the story we have been told about this pandemic isn’t true? What if, instead, the killer infection was neither the flu nor Spanish in origin? Newly analyzed documents reveal that the “Spanish Flu” may have been a military vaccine experiment gone awry. Summary The reason modern technology has not been able to pinpoint the killer influenza strain from this pandemic is because influenza…

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Italians’ extraordinary genetic diversity dates back 19,000 years

In Europe, Italians have the highest genetic diversity. The gradient of their genetic variability, scattered all over the peninsula, encloses on a small scale the whole genetic variance between southern and continental Europeans. This amazing diversity started to accumulate soon after the Late Glacial Maximum, which ended approximately 19,000 years ago. This is what researchers of the University of Bologna have reported in a paper published in BMC Biology . It is the first time that researchers have traced Italians’ genetic history. Results also show that there are genetic peculiarities…

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Italians’ extraordinary genetic diversity dates back 19,000

In Europe, Italians have the highest genetic diversity. The gradient of their genetic variability, scattered all over the peninsula, encloses on a small scale the whole genetic variance between southern and continental Europeans. This amazing diversity started to accumulate soon after the Late Glacial Maximum, which ended approximately 19,000 years ago. This is what researchers of the University of Bologna have reported in a paper published in BMC Biology . It is the first time that researchers have traced Italians’ genetic history. Results also show that there are genetic peculiarities…

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White settlers buried the truth about the Midwest’s mysterious mound cities

Around 1100 or 1200 A.D., the largest city north of Mexico was Cahokia, sitting in what is now southern Illinois, across the Mississippi River from St. Louis. Built around 1050 A.D. and occupied through 1400 A.D., Cahokia had a peak population of between 25,000 and 50,000 people. Now a UNESCO World Heritage Site, Cahokia was composed of three boroughs (Cahokia, East St. Louis, and St. Louis) connected to each other via waterways and walking trails that extended across the Mississippi River floodplain for some 20 square km. Its population consisted…

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Australian Aboriginal people were baking bread and farming grain 30,000 years ago

What would your response be if you were asked who were the world’s first bakers? Many people think of ancient Egypt first, where it is believed that bread was baked about 17,000 BCE first. But there is evidence that grindstones were used in Australia to turn seeds into flour 30 thousand years ago. The Gurandgi Munjie group is revitalizing native crops once cultivated by Aboriginal Australians, baking new bread with forgotten flours. At Cuddie Falls, in New South Wales, Archeologists found evidence of this in the form of an ancient…

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Supercomputer simulations reveal possible cause of Neanderthal extinction

Climate scientists from the IBS Center for Climate Physics discover that, contrary to previously held beliefs, Neanderthal extinction was neither caused by abrupt glacial climate shifts, nor by interbreeding with Homo sapiens. According to new supercomputer model simulations, only competition between Neanderthals and Homo sapiens can explain the rapid demise of Neanderthals around 43 to 38 thousand years ago. Neanderthals lived in Eurasia for at least 300,000 years. Then, around 43 to 38 thousand years ago they quickly disappeared off the face of the earth, leaving only weak genetic traces…

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Connection with Native Americans identified near Lake Baikal in Siberia using prehistoric genomes

Using human population genetics, ancient pathogen genomics and isotope analysis, a team of researchers assessed the population history of the Lake Baikal region, finding the deepest connection to date between the peoples of Siberia and the Americas. The current study, published in the journal Cell, also demonstrates human mobility, and hence connectivity, across Eurasia during the Early Bronze Age. Modern humans have lived near Lake Baikal since the Upper Paleolithic, and have left behind a rich archaeological record. Ancient genomes from the region have revealed multiple genetic turnovers and admixture…

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300,000-year-old nearly complete elephant skeleton found in Germany

Elephants ranged over Schöningen in Lower Saxony 300,000 years ago. In recent years, remains of at least ten elephants have been found at the Palaeolithic sites situated on the edges of the former opencast lignite mine. Now, archaeologists from the Senckenberg Centre for Human Evolution and Palaeoenvironment at the University of Tübingen, in cooperation with the Lower Saxony State Office for Heritage, have recovered for the first time in Schöningen an almost complete skeleton of a Eurasian straight-tusked elephant (Palaeoloxodon antiquus). The animal died on what was then the western…

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Tomb of jewelry-clad Iron Age ‘princess’ unearthed in France

An ancient tomb, dating back to the early Iron age, has been unearthed in France, revealing the resting place of an upper-class woman buried with a treasure trove of jewelry and other fancy trinkets. Stumbled upon by accident during construction works at a burial site near Saint-Vulbas – some 32km (20 miles) from Lyon – one of the tombs contained remains of an evidently upper-crust woman who lived in the 8th century BC. She was found inside an oak coffin, carved from a log, along with other signs of her…

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2,000-year-old underground rooms found by Jerusalem’s Western Wall

A singular two-millennia-old subterranean system of three rooms has been uncovered near the Western Wall. The three-room complex — painstakingly chiseled by hand out of bedrock prior to the fall of Jerusalem in 70 CE — is the first evidence of everyday life gone underground in the ancient city. “This is a unique finding. This is the first time a subterranean system has been uncovered adjacent to the Western Wall,” said Israel Antiquity Authority co-directors Dr. Barak Monnickendam-Givon and Tehila Sadiel in a press release Tuesday. “You must understand that…

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Double helix of masonry revealed as the secret of Italian renaissance domes

What can modern engineering learn from an erstwhile jeweler who built the largest masonry dome in existence? The construction of the Florentine duomo by Filippo Brunelleschi has been an engineering marvel for more than 500 years, showcasing ancient techniques that still hold valuable insights for modern engineering. Until now, it has remained a mystery how the master goldsmith and sculptor managed to build the masterpiece that pushes the limits of what is possible to construct even with modern building technologies, and how the masters who followed Brunelleschi carried on the…

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Global cooling 4,200-years ago spurred rice’s evolution

A major global cooling event that occurred 4,200 years ago may have led to the evolution of new rice varieties and the spread of rice into both northern and southern Asia, an international team of researchers has found. Their study, published in Nature Plants and led by the NYU Center for Genomics and Systems Biology, uses a multidisciplinary approach to reconstruct the history of rice and trace its migration throughout Asia. Rice is one of the most important crops worldwide, a staple for more than half of the global population.…

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The Head of the Hydra: Rise of Robert Kadlec

A POWERFUL NETWORK OF POLITICAL OPERATIVES, A GLOBAL VACCINE MAFIA AND THEIR MAN IN WASHINGTON. Last Friday, a group of Democratic Senators “demanded” that the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) Assistant Secretary for Preparedness and Response (ASPR) Robert Kadlec, “accurately disclose all his personal, financial and political ties in light of new reporting that he had failed to do so previously” after it was revealed that he had failed to note all “potential conflicts of interest” on his nomination paperwork. The report in question, published last Monday by…

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King Arthur: A legend felled by archaeology and DNA

Another fascinating program, King Arthur’s Britain: Truth Unearthed As a boy, I read in children’s books that after the Romans evacuated Britain early in the fifth century the indigenous peoples fell into warlike anarchy and only came together again under the leadership of King Arthur to confront the new invaders from Europe, the Angles, Saxons and Jutes, who had driven the Britons back to the western part of the isles. Just like the biblical story of King David, I am almost certain that the literary legends are fantasy. Archaeology and…

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Remembering Mount St. Helens eruption: 40 years later

May 17, 1980, 40 years ago today, was a beautiful day on the mountain in southwest Washington. It was also the most significant day of Carolyn Driedger’s life. She and a colleague had traveled to the active volcano Mount St. Helens to drop off equipment at a U.S. geological station. They planned to stay the night, but geologist David Johnston, tasked with monitoring the mountain, warned them against it. “He said, ‘Let’s just have as few people here as possible,’” Driedger recalled. “We were very disappointed that we were not…

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Feast of gazelle, pig and snails sheds light on Hellenist life in ancient Galilee

The remains of a Hellenist banquet dating back to 2,200 years ago recently uncovered by a group of archaeologists from the Tel Aviv University (TAU) have helped to shed light on the everyday life of Greek settlers in the land of Israel before the Galilee was conquered by the Hasmonean Kingdom. The pit was revealed during excavations at Tel Bet Yerah, headed by TAU Prof. Rafi Greenberg and Dr. Sarit Paz. Read More Related Articles As explained to The Jerusalem Post by Miriam Pines, one of the authors of the…

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A perfect storm: How early Christian farming in the Negev collapsed

The Negev Desert isn’t the first place that comes to mind when one thinks about agricultural abundance, yet beginning over 2,000 years ago and up to about 1,500 years ago very roughly, slightly less inhospitable parts of the desert were intensively farmed. From early Roman times, villagers in the Negev worked the bitter land. By the early Byzantine era, which began in 324 C.E., the farmers were flourishing by dint of remarkable water management and by strategically locating towering dovecotes in agricultural fields. The people grew olives, grapes and subsistence…

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Petroglyphs and cave painting in Iran suggests prehistorical Iranians migrated to Americas

Tehran – Some prehistorical residents of the Iranian plateau migrated to the Americas, an Iranian archaeologist and researcher says based on evidence from similarities between the petroglyphs and cave painting symbols in central Iran and the ones found in the Americas. “After years of exploring ancient paintings inside Iran’s caves and mountains and other parts of the globe, amazing achievements have been made in this regard,” Mohammad Nasserifard told IRNA in an interview released on Tuesday. “The ancient paintings of cave walls and mountains in Iran have been compared with…

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Dozens of archeological sites discovered by volunteers from home during lockdown

Dozens of previously-unrecorded Roman, prehistoric and medieval sites have been discovered by archaeology volunteers based at home during the coronavirus lockdown. Digging may be on hold due to the pandemic, but the team have found parts of two Roman roads, around 30 prehistoric or Roman large embanked settlement enclosures, around 20 prehistoric burial mounds, as well as the remains of hundreds of medieval farms, field systems and quarries. Those leading the project believe they will make many more discoveries in the coming weeks. The team, led by Dr Chris Smart…

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